Bird Identification

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Grimork
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 4:34 pm
Location: North Carolina

Bird Identification

Post by Grimork » Sat Aug 08, 2020 12:11 pm

Anyone familiar with a little brown dirt digging bird in NC? It's super cute. It has black under it's beak and neck and white belly. It digs in the dirt and fluffs itself like it's in a birdbath.
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C.E. Whiteoak
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Re: Bird Identification

Post by C.E. Whiteoak » Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:16 pm

Grimork, that appears to be a house sparrow, more commonly known as the English sparrow, because they came to North America as stowaways on ships hundreds of years ago. I have heard that they are not true sparrows, but I don't remember the exact category they belong in.

Anyway, they seem to prefer cities and towns, but if there happens to be a feed store out in the countryside somewhere, there will usually be a flock of these little critters hanging around.

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Grimork
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 4:34 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: Bird Identification

Post by Grimork » Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:38 pm

Yep that's it! Thank you C.E., apparently it was a male because it had the little black bib. I saw it in downtown Hickory. It was a lot of fun to watch him playing in the dirt and I was curious what kind of bird he was.
C.E. Whiteoak wrote:
Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:16 pm
Grimork, that appears to be a house sparrow, more commonly known as the English sparrow, because they came to North America as stowaways on ships hundreds of years ago. I have heard that they are not true sparrows, but I don't remember the exact category they belong in.

Anyway, they seem to prefer cities and towns, but if there happens to be a feed store out in the countryside somewhere, there will usually be a flock of these little critters hanging around.

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Will Williams
Posts: 2608
Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 9:22 am

Re: Bird Identification

Post by Will Williams » Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:42 pm

C.E. Whiteoak wrote:
Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:16 pm
Grimork, that appears to be a house sparrow, more commonly known as the English sparrow, because they came to North America as stowaways on ships hundreds of years ago. I have heard that they are not true sparrows, but I don't remember the exact category they belong in.

Anyway, they seem to prefer cities and towns, but if there happens to be a feed store out in the countryside somewhere, there will usually be a flock of these little critters hanging around.
Image
The House Sparrow
The House Sparrow is Not Native to North America
This bird is not native to North America. It is an aggressive species that will take over the nesting sites, territories, and food sources of native birds. Therefore; it is an invasive, non-native species that is very difficult to manage. For a more detailed description of the bird go to this link at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

House Sparrows Attack and Kill Native Nesting Birds

Some years ago, I opened one of our nest boxes to find a House Sparrow sitting on her eggs. She quickly flew away. Something was unusual. She built her nest on top of a Tree Sparrow nest. I removed the aggressor’s nest, tossed it on the ground and crushed the eggs. Underneath the nest was a dead female Tree Swallow. Her head had been crushed in by the attacking beak of the aggressor. The Tree Swallow’s eggs were still intact. How horrible a death...

Here's more about the pesky house sparrow: https://www.gettingmoreontheground.com/ ... e-sparrow/

Hmm? These little shitbirds are sort of like Mestizos: an invasive, non-native species that is very difficult to manage

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Grimork
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 4:34 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: Bird Identification

Post by Grimork » Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:58 pm

Gee, thanks Will for that horrific story. I'd never imagined something so cute could do something that vicious. Now I'm sad. :(
Will Williams wrote:
Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:42 pm
Image
The House Sparrow
The House Sparrow is Not Native to North America
This bird is not native to North America. It is an aggressive species that will take over the nesting sites, territories, and food sources of native birds. Therefore; it is an invasive, non-native species that is very difficult to manage. For a more detailed description of the bird go to this link at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

House Sparrows Attack and Kill Native Nesting Birds

Some years ago, I opened one of our nest boxes to find a House Sparrow sitting on her eggs. She quickly flew away. Something was unusual. She built her nest on top of a Tree Sparrow nest. I removed the aggressor’s nest, tossed it on the ground and crushed the eggs. Underneath the nest was a dead female Tree Swallow. Her head had been crushed in by the attacking beak of the aggressor. The Tree Swallow’s eggs were still intact. How horrible a death...

Here's more about the pesky house sparrow: https://www.gettingmoreontheground.com/ ... e-sparrow/

Hmm? These little shitbirds are sort of like Mestizos: an invasive, non-native species that is very difficult to manage

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