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Remaking the World 6/22/19

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White Man 1

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Remaking the World 6/22/19

PostSun Jun 30, 2019 1:29 pm

THIS WEEK my name was in the news worldwide. The vaguely leftist actor John Cusack retweeted my quote about learning who rules over you by finding out who you can’t criticize. The graphic with the quote in his retweet showed people being crushed under a giant arm with a star of David on its sleeve. Cusack added the words “follow the money.”


John Cusack’s tweet, shown here, mildly criticized Jews (even “criticized” may be too strong a word), and he was forced to grovel and apologize. Jews, in contrast, never apologize for incinerating non-Jews with phosphorous bombs, torturing them, or starving them to death, to cite but three examples.
Two pieces, this one from the Daily Caller, typify the media reaction to the tweet:

John Cusack has finally apologized for a “careless, dumb” anti-Semitic retweet after initially blaming the meme post on a bot.
“Well, if it needs more clarity – this can be instructive. Some thought to follow – 1. In reaction to Palestinian human rights under Israeli occupation, an issue that concerns anyone fighting for justice, I RT’d & quickly deleted an image that’s harmful to both Jewish & Palestinian friends, & for that I’m sorry,” the 52-year-old actor tweeted, according Tuesday to People magazine.

“The image depicted a blue Star of David, which I associated with Israel as their flag uses the same color & shape,” he added. “I know the star itself is deeply meaningful to Jews no matter where they stand on Israel’s attacks on Palestinians.”

Cusack continued, “The use of the star, even if it depicts the state of Israel – committing human rights violations – when combined with anti-Jewish tropes about power, is anti-Semitic and anti-Semitism has no place in any rational political dialogue…. To justify it, [it] would be as bad as conflating the cross with [the] U.S. flag when confronting U.S. atrocities. So I get why it was a careless, dumb thing to retweet.”

It came after followers called out the actor who retweeted the meme and wrote in the post, “Follow the money RT.” According to the Daily Beast, the picture “showed a large hand with the Star of David on its sleeve pushing down on people.”

The picture included a quote that read “To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize.” It is reportedly often misattributed to the French philosopher Voltaire. However, it was reportedly actually said by white nationalist Kevin Strom, per the BBC.

Initially, the “Say Anything” star deleted the post and said a “bot got me.”

“A bot got me- I thought I was endorsing a pro Palestinian justice retweet – of an earlier post – it came I think from a different source – Shouldn’t Have retweeted… ,” Cusack told to his millions of followers.

He then said by bot he actually meant alt-right social media accounts, which were the same thing because both were “not a person but an organized agenda.”

Wow, “organized agenda.” Such a bad thing. If Jewish power doesn’t have an “organized agenda,” I don’t know what does.

Here’s part of popculture.com’s take on the event:

John Cusack expressed regret Monday night after retweeting an inflammatory image that has been slammed as anti-Semitic.
The Say Anything actor retweeted an image of a large hand, whose arm wore a Star of David sleeve, crushing a mass of people. Next to the image was the quote “To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize.”

Although the quote was mistakenly attributed to the philosopher Voltaire, it is actually based on the writings of white nationalist Kevin Strom. Cusack, 52, added the remark, “Follow the money.”

When critics slammed the tweet as “disgusting” and anti-Semitic, Cusack wrote that he was speaking out against Israel’s “state violence” against Palestinians, rather than criticizing those of the Jewish faith. He did acknowledge that the tweet, which he has since deleted, included an “alt-right” image. In another now-deleted tweet, he wrote that “a bot got me.”
“I’m anti fascist-in every respect,” he added in response to the backlash.

Cusack’s explanation that an alt-right bot tricked him did little to quell the criticism against him, with critics calling on him to apologize. One commenter called him the “thinking man’s Scott Baio,” a reference to the conservative ’80s star, while Sen. Ted Cruz compared Cusack to Rep. Ilhan Omar, who was accused of an anti-Semitic tweet earlier this year.

“It’s clear that even if it was Israel’s flag and even if you don’t have an anti-Semitic bone in your body, it is still an anti-Semitic cartoon,” Cusack tweeted. “Because it deploys anti-Jewish stereotypes in its attacks on Israel, even if those critiques about state violence are legit I mistakenly … retweeted an alt-right account I thought was agreeing with the horrible bombing of a hospital in Palestine.

“In reaction to Palestinian human rights under Israeli occupation, an issue that concerns anyone fighting for justice, I retweeted and quickly deleted an image that’s harmful to both Jewish and Palestinian friends, and for that I’m sorry,” he continued.

“The image depicted a blue Star of David, which I associated with Israel as their flag uses the same color and shape. I know the star itself is deeply meaningful to Jews no matter where they stand on Israel’s attacks on Palestinians. The use of the star, even if it depicts the state of Israel — committing human rights violations — when combined with anti-Jewish tropes about power — is anti-Semitic and anti-Semitism has no place in any rational political dialogue. To justify it would be as bad as conflating the cross with U.S. flag when confronting U.S. atrocities. So I get why it was a careless dumb thing to retweet.”

“While I won’t take guff from anyone looking to score cheap shots on a [careless] mistweet, [it’s] good to use my mistake to spread awareness,” he added. “Solidarity and peace to all.”


Chaos, and Jewish screaming and rending of garments, immediately ensued after the retweet. Cusack, who initially didn’t know that a “bad person” had authored the quote — he thought it was Voltaire, as the meme he reposted claimed — reacted by weaseling and then apologizing, and immediately personally blocking me on Twitter.

Apparently Cusack has a little bit of conscience: He said, and I believe this, that in posting the quote he was highlighting Israeli atrocities against Palestinians. That’s still not something one does to gain brownie points in Hollywood — there’s a cost involved. And Cusack, I was told, once said that Hollywood is a “city of whores” or words to that general effect — again, not something said to ingratiate himself with the Weinsteins of this world.


Many graphic images of the quote are available via search engines.

The original quote, taken from a 1993 American Dissident Voices broadcast

My quote, in various forms, has gone viral on the ’Net over the last few years — it’s seen almost everywhere, on nearly every platform, in several variants (I’ve said it more than one way myself), being shared by people from many backgrounds and political beliefs, being condemned as trash and being praised as wisdom, and most of the time without giving credit to me — credit usually being given to the great French writer and skeptic Voltaire. Good company to be in, I suppose — Voltaire was a deep thinker and a ferocious critic of both Jews and of the Christianity that the Jews foisted upon our race — but I do have a bone to pick with whoever it was that first made the fake attribution: It’s not honorable, trying to take away my “due mead of glory” for coming up with a pithy way of saying a universal truth. It’s a truth I don’t take credit for discovering — it has been noted by many throughout the centuries, I’m sure. Back in the 1960s George Lincoln Rockwell expressed the same basic idea in one of his brilliant speeches. But I do deserve credit for distilling it into quotable form.


The interesting thing about this dust-up isn’t me, though. It’s the fact that powerful, truthful ideas — this one included — are remaking the world.

The most amazing part — and everyone should be talking about this because it’s so glaringly obvious — is that the reaction to the quote proves the quote is true. The reaction — forcing Cusack to apologize, as Australian politician Cory Bernardi was forced to apologize not too long ago for the same “offense” — proves that the quote is true and further proves that the identification of the illegitimate rulers is also true.

In fact, Cusack’s posting of my quote, and the note he added to it, said a lot more than just deploring Israel’s murders of the innocent: He also clearly implied that the Israelis are getting away with their holocaust against the helpless because they are powerful, because they are Jewish, because they have incredible wealth, and because they are the de facto rulers of our society. And his implications are undoubtedly and obviously true. That, more than any connection with me, is what enraged the media and the Jewish groups. The connection to me is just being used as another cudgel to beat Cusack and intimidate anyone who might be tempted to spread the meme further — and as a distraction so readers will be less likely to think about these truths.


It’s everywhere, it’s everywhere! Shut it down!

Laws and regulations have been enacted in America making it illegal or punishable to boycott the Jewish state: What was that about who we are “not allowed to criticize”?

I suspect that, despite his groveling apology and Soviet-style self-condemnation and abasement, Cusack’s career is all downhill from here in Jewish-run Hollywood. Maybe some Gentile billionaires will help him form a production company with Mel Gibson and other talented outcasts that could get somewhere — there have to be a lot of creative, intelligent people in LA who hate the rot and filth and shallowness that the Jews have made of the film industry.

And it’s not just film stars who are taking a much more laundiced view of Jewish/Zionist power these days: American politicians are usually very careful never to mention the facts of Jewish power, though they — more than anyone else — are painfully aware of those facts. A very few of them have spoken about what they know. It’s a truism to everyone except ignorant conservatives that Jewish power is the centerpiece of the American politician’s whole life. The Jewish media determine how the boobs will view the politician, therefore he can never afford to cross the Jews, or they’ll rip him to shreds on the air and in print. The great thing we’re seeing now is that the numbers of non-boobs — the people who are no longer fooled — on both the left and right and middle is growing every day.


From National Vanguard, circa 2003
In Europe and elsewhere, where Zionist power is closely linked to American dominance — something that is justly resented, even hated — it’s easier for politicians to be Israel-unfriendly and still get elected. It’s gotten to the point that, even in Jew-ridden England, Zionism and Israel are finally getting to be dirty words.


As I’ve said before on this program, the increasing awareness of, and concern about Jewish power, in high and higher circles bodes well for the future. The apparent “philo-Semitism” of the White elite is thin and forced. The right crisis at the right time could break it wide open. Zionism is already dead in Europe. Support for Israel is drying up fast everywhere except the United States, and even here the Left is waking up.



If France or Germany or Russia, or even Britain or America, finds itself plunged into chaos or hunger, the politicians might quickly discover that loyalty and open allegiance to their own people — and not Jews or their pet aliens — is the only way to survive. The Jews’ mirror-house of illusions — their false paradigm that Jewish interests and White interests are always identical — is already known to be false by those Gentiles who shout it the loudest in public. A general strike, a prolonged blackout, a serious crop failure, a serious mistake by America that brings a 9/11-like event to one of our capitals — any of these could transform the covert resentment of Jewish power into open opposition. And, as I’ve also said before: You heard it here first!


As the power structure engages in ever more repression, awareness of whose power structure it is increases.
_______


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