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Could Caucasians Survive Explosive Decompression?

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Wade Hampton III

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Could Caucasians Survive Explosive Decompression?

PostTue Apr 23, 2019 2:24 am

Here is what happens: within 12 to 20 seconds you lose the ability to
make purposeful movements and think clearly. A few seconds later you
might be dimly aware of what is happening and then you’d black out
within about 30 seconds in vacuum. In 5 to 7 minutes you would be
irrecoverably dead. But it appears that if you can be brought back
inside within a minute or two of exposure you can make a full and
quick recovery.

Our Caucasian astronauts would NOT “explode!” The reason is
that almost all of the human body is liquid or solid and liquids
and solids do not change their volume with pressure. Only
gases do that. In the body the only air spaces are the lungs
and ears and the openings from lungs and ears. When
exposed to vacuum the air in the lungs escapes through
the mouth and nose, air in the ears escapes in the worst
case by rupturing the eardrums. It is not very dramatic.
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Also note that the difference in pressure is not much between being
on Earth at sea level and in space. Sea level pressure is only
1000 millibars. The pressure difference between a typical SCUBA
diver and sea level can be five times as much and they survive
swimming to the surface just fine. The body does not freeze either
because vacuum is a near perfect insulator. This is why we use
vacuum to isolate thermos bottles. So heat stays in the body for
a long time. The only cooling method is radiative. Conduction is
impossible in vacuum. Water in vacuum boils at a temperature well
below body temperature. So after death, the water will slowly
sublimate. The effect is exactly like freeze dried foods. So the
astronaut is ejected into space. He can think and move for about
15 seconds then his thinking grows foggy and he has literally no
energy, can no longer stay awake and he blacks out. If found and
brought back inside in the next minute or two he recovers otherwise
the brain dies from lack of oxygen and the body very slowly cools
and loses water to sublimation.
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As it turns out, the scene in the movie “2001” (where Dave ejects
himself into space without a space helmet) is realistic. He
survives for the few seconds he needs to get inside the ship
then makes quick and full recovery. That scene was based on tests
NASA did early in the space program. Because “What happens if the
suit fails?” is such an obvious question that NASA spent some money
to find the answer and did actual testing.
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The big thing that folks forget is that gas laws apply only to gas.
Liquids and solids do not expand in a vacuum. We also forget that
the difference in pressure between “normal” and vacuum is “only”
as much as the difference in pressure we experience at 30 feet
under water and at the surface. So analogies with very deep
underwater diving do not apply. The cause of disability and death
in vacuum is simply “hypoxia” — a low level of dissolved oxygen
in the blood.
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Will Williams

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Re: Could Caucasians Survive Explosive Decompression?

PostTue Apr 23, 2019 2:06 pm

Our people have barely survived desegregation. Chances of surviving explosive decompression look even slimmer.

We must entirely separate from the Semites and other non-Whites. That's the last best chance for surviving as a race.


Wade Hampton III wrote:Here is what happens: within 12 to 20 seconds you lose the ability to
make purposeful movements and think clearly. A few seconds later you
might be dimly aware of what is happening and then you’d black out
within about 30 seconds in vacuum. In 5 to 7 minutes you would be
irrecoverably dead...
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Wade Hampton III

  • Posts: 1975
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  • Location: Pontiac, SC

Re: Could Caucasians Survive Explosive Decompression?

PostTue Apr 23, 2019 2:31 pm

Will Williams wrote:Our people have barely survived desegregation. Chances of surviving explosive decompression look even slimmer. We must entirely separate from the Semites and other non-Whites. That's the last best chance for surviving as a race.


Sharing our North American continent with alien races is most likely why
the events portrayed in "2001: A Space Odyssey" never took place. Remember
the James Webb Space Telescope that was supposed to have been launched
in 2014? It was supposed to have replaced the ageing Hubble, which was
place into low Earth orbit in 1990. James Webb Telescope is parked somewhere
in a NASA storage bin gathering dust. Meanwhile, what is left of NASA must
rely on the Russians for access to the International Space Station. The Space
Shuttle was at best a risky undertaking - which some have described as a flying
coffin. So much for "the wonders of diversity" :lol:
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Will Williams

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Re: Could Caucasians Survive Explosive Decompression?

PostWed Apr 24, 2019 10:44 am

Wade Hampton III wrote:
Will Williams wrote:Our people have barely survived desegregation. Chances of surviving explosive decompression look even slimmer. We must entirely separate from the Semites and other non-Whites. That's the last best chance for surviving as a race.


Sharing our North American continent with alien races is most likely why
the events portrayed in "2001: A Space Odyssey" never took place. Remember
the James Webb Space Telescope that was supposed to have been launched
in 2014? It was supposed to have replaced the ageing Hubble, which was
place into low Earth orbit in 1990. James Webb Telescope is parked somewhere
in a NASA storage bin gathering dust. Meanwhile, what is left of NASA must
rely on the Russians for access to the International Space Station. The Space
Shuttle was at best a risky undertaking - which some have described as a flying
coffin. So much for "the wonders of diversity" :lol:

James Webb was born in Oxford, NC, where I and my brothers and father and many other Williams relatives were also born (actually he was born in the Tally Ho community, just outside of Oxford, where my first wife's grandfather had a 360-acre farm). Webb will be in our Hall of White Heroes.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope: Hubble's Cosmic Successor
By Elizabeth Howell July 17, 2018

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled for launch in 2021, will probe the cosmos to uncover the history of the universe from the Big Bang to alien planet formation and beyond. It will focus on four main areas: first light in the universe, assembly of galaxies in the early universe, birth of stars and protoplanetary systems, and planets (including the origins of life.)

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will launch on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana, then take 30 days to fly a million miles to its permanent home: a Lagrange point, or a gravitationally stable location in space. It will orbit around L2, a spot in space near Earth that lies opposite from the sun. This has been a popular spot for several other space telescopes, including the Herschel Space Telescope and the Planck Space Observatory.

The powerful $8.8 billion spacecraft is also expected to take amazing photos of celestial objects like its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope. Luckily for astronomers, the Hubble Space Telescope remains in good health and it's probable that the two telescopes will work together for JWST's first years. JWST will also look at exoplanets that the Kepler Space Telescope found, or follow up on real-time observations from ground space telescopes...

Image

Read more about Jim Webb and his telescope, here: https://www.space.com/21925-james-webb- ... -jwst.html
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Could Caucasians Survive Explosive Decompression?

PostWed Apr 24, 2019 2:54 pm

Problem is...once the thing is up there...there is no going out there to fix it
in the event of problems, as did the earlier Hubble. NASA can only hitch rides
with the Russians even for access to the ISS. Beanos are swarming the launch
centers in Texas and Florida, so the future looks pretty grim for now.

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