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The Secessionist State of Franklin -- Can it Happen Again?

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Will Williams

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Re: The Secessionist State of Franklin -- Can it Happen Agai

PostSat Mar 02, 2019 1:25 pm

Bump!
Speaking of the NSM, this is an example of why the National Alliance does not associate with such ill-advised "Movement" groups:

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Neo-Nazi group's leader is black
man who vows to dissolve it

Feb 28, 2019
Associated Press

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One of the nation's largest neo-Nazi groups appears to have an unlikely new leader: a black activist who has vowed to dismantle it.

Court documents filed Thursday suggest James Hart Stern wants to use his new position as director and president of the National Socialist Movement to undermine the Detroit-based group's defense against a lawsuit.The NSM is one of several extremist groups sued over bloodshed at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Stern's filing asks a federal court in Virginia to issue a judgment against the group before one of the lawsuits goes to trial.
Stern replaced Jeff Schoep as the group's leader in January, according to Michigan corporate records. But those records and court documents say nothing about how or why Stern got the position. His feat invited comparisons to the recent Spike Lee movie "BlacKkKlansman" in which a black police officer infiltrates a branch of the Ku Klux Klan.Schoep did not respond Thursday to emails and calls seeking comment.

Matthew Heimbach, a leading white nationalist figure who briefly served as the NSM's community outreach director last year, said Schoep and other group leaders have been at odds with rank-and-file members over its direction. Heimbach said some members "essentially want it to remain a politically impotent white supremacist gang" and resisted ideological changes advocated by Schoep.Heimbach said Schoep's apparent departure and Stern's installation as its leader probably spell the end of the group in its current form. Schoep was 21 when he took control of the group in 1994 and renamed it the National Socialist Movement, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center."I think it's kind of a sad obit for one of the longest-running white nationalist organizations," said Heimbach, who estimates it had about 40 active, dues-paying members last year.

The group has drawn much larger crowds at rallies.NSM members used to attend rallies and protests in full Nazi uniforms, including at a march in Toledo, Ohio, that sparked a riot in 2005. More recently, Schoep tried to rebrand the group and appeal to a new generation of racists and anti-Semites by getting rid of such overt displays of Nazi symbols.It appeared that Stern, of Moreno Valley, California, had been trying for at least two years to disrupt the group. A message posted on his website said he would be meeting with Schoep in February 2017 "to sign a proclamation acknowledging the NSM denouncing being a white supremacist group.""I have personally targeted eradicating the (Ku Klux Klan) and the National Socialist Movement, which are two organizations here in this country which have all too long been given privileges they don't deserve," Stern said in a video posted on his site.On Wednesday, lawyers for the plaintiffs suing white supremacist groups and movement leaders over the Charlottesville violence asked the court to sanction Schoep. They say he has ignored his obligations to turn over documents and give them access to his electronic devices and social media accounts. They also claim Schoep recently fired his attorney as a stalling tactic.A federal magistrate judge in Charlottesville ruled last Friday that Stern cannot represent the NSM in the case because he does not appear to be a licensed attorney. That did not deter Stern from filing Thursday's request for summary judgment against his own group."It is the decision of the National Socialist Movement to plead liable to all causes of actions listed in the complaint against it," he wrote.Stern served a prison sentence for mail fraud at the same facility as onetime Ku Klux Klan leader Edgar Ray Killen, who was convicted in the "Mississippi Burning" killings of three civil rights workers. Killen died in January 2018.In 2012, Stern claimed Killen signed over to him power of attorney and ownership of 40 acres of land while they were serving prison terms together. A lawyer for Killen asked a judge to throw out the land transfer and certify that Killen and his family owned the property.

https://www.ajc.com/news/neo-nazi-group ... b1BHzCeuI/
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Will Williams

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Re: The Secessionist State of Franklin -- Can it Happen Agai

PostTue Mar 05, 2019 2:54 pm

Will Williams wrote:Bump!
Speaking of the NSM, this is an example of why the National Alliance does not associate with such ill-advised "Movement" groups:

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[size=200]Neo-Nazi group's leader is black
man who vows to dissolve it
Feb 28, 2019
Associated Press [...]
Image
"Neo-Nazi" Fuhrer James Stern


More about this pathetic case of the Negro leader of the National Socialist Movement, here: https://www.theoaklandpress.com/news/st ... 835af.html

Alliance members can rest assured that nothing like this will ever happen to our organization. The National Alliance is neither a Nazi organization nor a neo-Nazi organization, despite our being characterized as such by enemies such as the Southern Poverty Law Center, other Jewish groups, and controlled Jewish mass media who use those buzz terms for their bogeyman effect.
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Will Williams

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Re: The Secessionist State of Franklin -- Can it Happen Agai

PostThu Jun 27, 2019 8:52 pm

Will Williams wrote:This article is not from the Industrial Age, but perhaps we can form a new section for Secessionist Movements.

http://www.northcarolinahistory.org/com ... /218/entry

The State of Franklin: Mountain Secession and Independent Thought

In North Carolina, regionalism has existed since day one. In August 1784, western North Carolinians established the State of Franklin—“the only de facto state that functioned in every aspect of statal power,” writes historian Samuel Cole Williams. After a civil war in the mountains, however, the “Lost State of Franklin” ceased in February 1789.

During the 1780s, North Carolina was under the Articles of Confederation (the Constitution was drafted in 1787 and ratified by all 13 original colonies by 1789). At that time, “western North Carolina” stretched from the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River.


http://ricktylerforcongress.com/tenness ... n-now/Soon after the establishment of the state of North Carolina in 1776, North Carolina mountaineers believed the state government always looked eastward. The irresponsive government of North Carolina angered those in the transmontane region (most lived along the Watauga and Nolichucky rivers); it offered no protection from the dangers of the frontier and used taxes to benefit primarily the eastern part of the state. Plus, Franklinites later argued, its seat was too far away for western North Carolinians to send delegates for timely representation.

These problems irritated mountaineers more, when they remembered that they shouldered the onerous burden of fighting to secure western land—land that the state sold to pay off its Revolutionary War debt. In particular, after the “Land Grab Act” (c. 1783) opened western land for sale, western North Carolinians alleged land warrant fraud; legislators and their business partners acquired land warrants for three of the four million acres sold.

The State of Franklin received its first breath in 1784, when the North Carolina legislature ceded its land to the federal government. Already upset with their state government, Washington, Sullivan, and Greene countians, in what would become Tennessee, decided to start their own state and stretch its borders westward and issue land warrants. Meanwhile, angry North Carolina voters replaced their representatives with a legislative body that repealed the act of cession.

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The State of Franklin in Upper East Tennessee

Although North Carolina did not recognize its statehood, Franklin operated for almost five years like any other state. It granted, for example, land warrants and marriage licenses and built roads. Franklin leaders even negotiated treaties with the Cherokee and in the state’s waning days, they sought to be annexed by Spain. John Sevier, a former leader of the Watauga Association (the first autonomous white government in the British colonies) and leader of the Wataugans at the Battle of King’s Mountain, served as the first governor.

After a series of problems, including a congressional rejection for statehood and warfare with the Cherokee, many in Franklin, under the direction of John Tipton, called for a return to North Carolina. The denouement in Franklin’s story was in 1788, when a North Carolina sheriff seized Sevier’s property for back taxes. The Franklin Army marched to Tipton’s home where a skirmish, called the Battle of Franklin, ensued. Later arrested for treason and jailed in Morganton, Sevier was rescued by his followers who tried to form, south of the French Broad River, what they called Lesser Franklin.

In February 1789 the leaders of Franklin pledged allegiance to North Carolina. The Tar Heel State, now rid of its competition, ceded its western land to the United States and thereby acquired authority over all legal claims to North Carolina land warrants.

The State of Franklin provided the nucleus of Tennessee, established in 1796. John Sevier was its first governor.

Many have criticized the Franklinites and their act of secession. But they embodied the noble spirit of the American Revolution. These western North Carolinians tried, as stated in the Declaration of Independence, to “abolish a destructive government” that had abused their rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness and tried to “institute [a] new Government” that was most likely to “effect their Safety and Happiness.”

By Troy L. Kickler, founding director of the North Carolina History Project
See Also:
Related Categories: Places, Early America, Colonial North Carolina
Timeline: 1776-1835


Tennessee Secession Now! East Tennessee anyway!

Excerpt:
Why Not Tennessee?

If we fail to go the way of secession, our inevitable fate will be abject bondage and tyranny. History has proven that the Anti-Federalists were justified and prescient in their concerns. Centralization and concentration of power always leads to excess and abuse. Man simply cannot be too meticulous or dutiful in his quest to guard against the reflexive tendency toward tyrannical excess on the part of government. The status quo has gone so far beyond the pale of reason and legitimacy that profound and dramatic corrective action are both urgent and mandatory.

The secession phenomenon must have a point of genesis and commencement. Tennessee would seem to be the most logical flash point for such history-altering activity to occur. The following points of observation are relevant in this regard:

First...among conservative Southern states, Tennessee retains the highest percentage of Caucasian representation in its population base.

Second...Tennessee’s rich history features the distinction of being known as the Volunteer State...an inspiring reference to the amazing character of our great ancestors who made inordinate sacrifices on behalf of liberty at the Alamo.

Third...we are the native soil of men such as Crockett, Forrest, and Jackson...individuals who, in their own critical hour of history, set the standard for rising to the occasion and holding the line against immeasurable odds.

On a practical and tangible level, Tennessee also weighs in with readily observable attributes and characteristics. Geographically, we are centrally located in what would be likely to evolve into the New Confederacy. Our topography, climate, and natural resources are all favorable and constitute a strong allure for the attraction and drawing in of potential future inhabitants of a desirable nature and quality.

http://ricktylerforcongress.com/tenness ... ssion-now/
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: The Secessionist State of Franklin -- Can it Happen Agai

PostFri Jun 28, 2019 1:26 pm

Please do not overlook the terrain of the northwest corner of SC. The land is mountainous and the high altitude
is favorable to Caucasians. For reasons unknown to me, the thin rarefied atmosphere seems unamenable to
darkies and Gooks. The land would not be favorable to agriculture, but industrious Caucasians could utilize it
for manufacturing and research.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: The Secessionist State of Franklin -- Can it Happen Agai

PostSat Jun 29, 2019 1:26 am

The common theme of this thread is the dream of a White ethnostate, and that certainly is a dream worth fostering in as many Whites as we can reach. It occurs to me that a bit of the 'state-within-a-state' might be in order to provide the antecedent to that ethnostate. It's one big reason I see the NA as being a useful tool, the model of organization and the training ground for future leaders is present here, though in need of more people and further development.
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