Kin's Domains in Russia

Regarding children, family, and the home.
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Grimork
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Kin's Domains in Russia

Post by Grimork » Mon Jun 20, 2022 9:47 am

https://ecominded.net/russian-family-homesteads

I think this is a perfect example of what we should all strive to work on and give to our children. There's at least 400 of these communities already started in Russia. I think at a bare minimum we should have guidelines like these in our own community as well.


A Kin's domain is a piece of land at least 1 hectare (2.5 acres) in size owned and developed by an individual or a family who prefer living their lives in nature, off the grid, to the hustle and bustle of city life. They provide a sustainable way of living which also helps improve the quality of our planet.

Why one hectare? Because this is a sufficient minimum amount of land sizable enough to sustain the basic life-long and multi-generational needs of each family or domain settler. This is an amount of land that can be stewarded sustainably by the efforts of an individual or family, without becoming too difficult to manage and that can be managed without the need for heavy industrial agricultural machinery or harmful chemicals and fertilizers or pesticides and without the need for reliance on declining fossils fuels.

...

Each domain settler or family owns their own land. It is not owned by the community. The reason for this is so that they can fully invest in the beautifying of the land by restoring natural systems and commit to making a lifetime long-term investment, first in the initial restoration of the land followed by the lifelong stewardship of their land plot which can then remain in the family and be passed on to successive generations.

A Kin's Domain differs from the eco-village or commune model where each individual is dependent on the collective always functioning and properly working together to meet the basic needs of all its individuals especially in matters of food production. On a Kin Domain each family/settler's goal is to become self sufficient, to stand on their own, with the surrounding domains creating a strong supportive network and community.
Of course, there is a great need for working together in a Kin community, and this vital work must begin before even a single person builds their own unique domain. Much forethought and planning is needed. In each village of Kin's Domains there will most likely be land that is shared by the collective community. This shared land could include such areas as:

* a shared lake or large body of water, * a school, * a community meeting centre, * community agricultural lands or pasture, * a visitor’s centre, * forest lands, * riverside, * roadway access, and more.

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Will Williams
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Re: Kin's Domains in Russia

Post by Will Williams » Mon Jun 20, 2022 10:13 am

Grimork wrote:
Mon Jun 20, 2022 9:47 am
...On a Kin Domain each family/settler's goal is to become self sufficient, to stand on their own, with the surrounding domains creating a strong supportive network and community.
Of course, there is a great need for working together in a Kin community, and this vital work must begin before even a single person builds their own unique domain. Much forethought and planning is needed. In each village of Kin's Domains there will most likely be land that is shared by the collective community. This shared land could include such areas as:

* a shared lake or large body of water, * a school, * a community meeting centre, * community agricultural lands or pasture, * a visitor’s centre, * forest lands, * riverside, * roadway access, and more.
Very good, Grimotk. The Kin Domains of our Russian cousins sound very much like our Cosmotheist Communities model.
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Riley
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Re: Kin's Domains in Russia

Post by Riley » Mon Jun 20, 2022 6:24 pm

Great post. In addition to their demonstration of the power and importance of community effort, I really like that they're building these houses using naturally available materials, just like our ancestors always did. I have been looking more closely at these techniques recently, because I would like to build my home this way too. I haven't settled on a specific style of construction, but they all seem to have pros and cons. Maybe you saw the video I shared recently of that Primitive Technology guy on YouTube building a structure with his own handmade bricks and tiles. There is some very good information there: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAL3JX ... lZyD3nQdBA

I think learning these construction techniques (and having this sort of creative resourcefulness in general) is very important for all of us in terms of boosting our self-reliance and minimizing our expenses. I don't have anything against modern-style homes per se, but as they point out in the video here, these types of homes require a lot of energy (money) to build, and even if one has the money for it, personally I don't think it's worth spending that crazy amount of money just to have all the niceties that come with modern houses. From "Prospectus for a New Community":
Dr. Pierce wrote:The austerity, although unavoidable at this time, also will be deliberate in the future. It accords better with the community’s nature and purpose than does luxury. Although the community always will endeavor to have the best tools available and to use them to perform its work efficiently, it will not put a premium on physical comfort for its own sake or on reducing physical exertion to a minimum. Manual labor is an activity which should benefit every member, and discomfort in moderation is not necessarily to be shunned. Parsimony in the use of resources, whether personal or community, should be the rule rather than conspicuous consumption.
I'm sure a lot of spoiled Americans would balk at the idea of living in a clay house without all the modern amenities they've grown attached to, but if you ask me our money should ideally be spent only on things that are 1: true necessities and 2: things that can only be reasonably obtained with money. I'd rather build a house like this and use the money I saved for a solar power setup or a reliable truck, for example. Both of these are things that serve a valuable purpose which can't really be replaced by simple hard work and a willingness to live with a bit of discomfort.

However, as shown here and elsewhere, it is very possible to build a sturdy home out of literally dirt-cheap materials that serves its primary purpose well. Nobody is going to say that such a home is luxurious, but as long as it effectively shelters its inhabitants from the elements and provides a suitable living and storage space, nearly everything else is unnecessary.

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