Let's Look at One Lying Washington Post Jew

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Will Williams
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Let's Look at One Lying Washington Post Jew

Post by Will Williams » Sun Jan 31, 2021 12:27 pm

This Washington Post article could just as well be featured in White Biocentrism's Military section, but let's pick it apart here.
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The military said it wants to fight white
supremacy. What is it waiting for?


Image
Supporters of President Donald Trump roam the streets in Washington, D.C., January 6, 2021. (Astrid Riecken/For The Washington Post)

By Eric Lichtblau
Eric Lichtblau is a journalist and author in Washington DC who writes about national security and law enforcement. He is writing a book on the surge in hate crimes carried out by white supremacists.
Jan. 29, 2021 at 12:14 p.m. EST

As a private in the Florida National Guard, Brandon Russell led a double life, carrying out exercises with his infantry team while heading a violent neo-Nazi group and reportedly recruiting like-minded troops until 2017. At his condo in Tampa, he had a flag with the Nazi swastika on the wall, a framed photo of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh — himself a military veteran — and a cache of bombmaking material in the garage.

The attempted insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 — after which veterans and active-duty service members accounted for at least 27 of the initial arrests, or nearly 20 percent of the total — exposed the crossover of military personnel to violent extremism and white supremacy. The participants included a former Navy SEAL and a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel, photographed on the Senate floor wearing tactical gear and carrying zip-tie handcuffs. The military was overrepresented among the rioters.

The ugly sight of service members in combat gear amid Confederate flags and white-nationalist slogans marked a harrowing escalation of a problem that the Pentagon has allowed to fester for decades. It confirmed the worst fears about an extremist subculture in the armed services acting out of loyalty not to their sworn oaths but to their own dangerous agenda. It should have surprised no one.

Ronald Reagan’s first defense secretary, Caspar Weinberger, pledged to combat extremists in the military in 1986 after reports showed that numerous service members were active in the Ku Klux Klan and other white-supremacist groups. He banned military personnel from having any involvement with such organizations, and as reports have continued to emerge in the years since, Pentagon officials have issued numerous follow-up restrictions. Indeed, the Pentagon had ordered up two more reviews of the problem less than a month before the Capitol attack. Still, the pull of extremism and white supremacy in the ranks has persisted — a reflection, some outside experts say, of poor enforcement and oversight by the military of its own rules.

Take Russell, the neo-Nazi leader in Florida. When he entered the National Guard, screeners took note of a tattoo on his shoulder of a radiation-warning symbol, but they didn’t recognize it as the logo of his group, the Atomwaffen Division. While officers reprimanded Russell for his vocal homophobia in the barracks, they said there were no clear signs at the time of his dual life as a neo-Nazi — though prosecutors later charged that he had used his status and training in “fulfilling his neo-Nazi mission.”

How Trumpism risked politicizing the military

It wasn’t until a double killing at Russell’s condo in Tampa in May 2017 — when another man who had been involved with Atomwaffen allegedly shot two other members — that police discovered the huge stockpile of explosives Russell had in his garage, along with firearms and his stash of neo-Nazi paraphernalia. As police searched the scene, Russell was still dressed in his Guard uniform after returning home from weekend duty. He is now in federal prison serving a five-year sentence on explosives charges.

Days before President Biden’s inauguration on Jan. 20, concerns about internal security prompted an 11th-hour vetting of the 25,000 National Guard troops massed in the capital to protect the swearing-in. The background checks led the Guard to remove a dozen members from the inauguration mission — all of whom, according to the Associated Press, “were found to have ties with right-wing militia groups or posted extremist views online.” The military has not explained why those ties were not discovered before the personnel were sent to protect the event.

Since the Capitol riot, military officials have vowed to redouble their efforts to weed out extremists and white supremacists. But there is little to suggest that such steps represent more than lip service in combating such a pervasive problem, especially as the racial chasm in America grew wider during the Trump era.

Derek Barsaleau was an Army specialist who served in Afghanistan, but he also kept up a proud allegiance to neo-Nazi groups, including the notorious National Alliance and the World Church of the Creator. He was never shy about voicing his beliefs to his fellow soldiers. The military “was rampant with white supremacists,” Barsaleau told me. Since then he has denounced that ideology and now works with an anti-hate group in Wisconsin. But he says the appeal of white supremacy to service members has only become more powerful in the last few years — thanks in part, he believes, to Donald Trump’s divisive racial rhetoric.

How the military once transformed itself to address racism

Indeed, a survey published last year by the Military Times found that 36 percent of active-duty service members — and half of minorities — had seen signs of white nationalism or ideologically driven racism in the armed forces, a spike of 14 percentage points from just a year earlier. Remarkably, service members also reported that they considered white nationalism within their own ranks to be a greater national security threat than domestic Islamic terrorism — and more worrisome than North Korea, Afghanistan, Iraq or other global threats.

Warning signs abounded just last year in a string of violent, politically inspired episodes carried out by active-duty or retired service members, several in direct response to Black Lives Matter protests. There was the killing of a security officer and the wounding of another near a BLM protest in Oakland, Calif. — allegedly by an active-duty Air Force sergeant who had aligned himself with the anti-government “boogaloo boys” movement. In Las Vegas, three veterans also affiliated with the boogaloos were charged with plotting to detonate molotov cocktails at a BLM protest and to stoke violence among protesters. And a 22-year-old Army private from Louisville was accused of plotting with an overseas neo-Nazi group to attack his own military unit in Turkey. A federal prosecutor declared that the soldier, Ethan Melzer, “was the enemy within.”

Meanwhile, anti-government extremist groups like the Three Percenters and the Oath Keepers have made inroads in recruiting current and former members not only of the military, but of police agencies across the country. Both groups had a presence at the Capitol riot.

Predictably, in the wake of the failed insurrection, Pentagon officials have denounced the role of their own personnel. “These people are not representative of our country’s military,” Gen. Mark A. Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the New York Times. Whether the military can make good on its oft-repeated pledges to rid itself of such extremists is an urgent dilemma confronting the entire country.
---
https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/ ... story.html

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Will Williams
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Re: Let's Look at One Lying Washington Post Jew

Post by Will Williams » Sun Jan 31, 2021 1:03 pm

Our favorite Jew-controlled free Internet encyclopedia, Wikipedia, tells us about this member of the Tribe, here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Lichtblau
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Eric Lichtblau (born 1965) is an American journalist, reporting for The New York Times in the Washington bureau, as well as the Los Angeles Times, Time magazine, The New Yorker, and the CNN network's investigative news unit. He has earned two Pulitzer Prizes for his work. He received a Pulitzer Prize in 2006 with the New York Times for his reporting on warrantless wiretapping by the National Security Agency. He also was part of the New York Times team that won the Pulitzer in 2017 for coverage of Russia and the Trump campaign. He is the author of ...The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men.

Life and career
Lichtblau was born to a Jewish family[1] in Syracuse, New York, and graduated from Cornell University in 1987 with majors in government and English. After college, Lichtblau served stints with the Los Angeles Times investigative team in Los Angeles and covered various law enforcement beats. He worked at the Los Angeles Times for 15 years, covering the Justice Department in their Washington bureau between 1999 and 2000.

Lichtblau joined The New York Times in September 2002 as a correspondent covering the Justice Department,[2] and published his last story for the paper in April 2017.[3] In that month he became an editor for CNN;[4] just two months later, in June 2017, he was among three CNN editors who resigned following the retraction of a report regarding alleged contact between the presidential transition team of Donald Trump and a Russian state-owned bank.[4][5]

Books
...In The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men, Lichtblau uncovered the full details of Operation Paper Clip, a story that had been carefully guarded by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency for over sixty years. Unknown to Americans, and fully aware of the monstrous crimes many had committed, the CIA provided a safe haven for thousands of Nazi scientists and spies after World War II. Most of the scientists recruited had worked on Hitler's V2 rocket project. The most well known of the Nazi scientists was Wernher Von Braun, often described as the "Father of Rocket Science"...
be continued...
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Elizabeth Holtzman described the book as a "fast paced, important book about the justice department's efforts to bring Nazi war criminals in the United States to justice that also uses recently declassified facts to expose the secret, reprehensible collaboration of U. S. intelligence agencies with those very Nazis". In both of his books, Lichtblau used first rate research to uncover what many would consider abuses of power by government agencies.[9]

Image
Ace Jewess Nazi hunter Elizabeth Holtzman
(read about Liz's worldwide search for Josef Mengele back when she was (D. NY), chairman of the House Judiciary subcommittee responsible for tracing alleged Nazi war criminals in the United States, here: https://nationalvanguard.org/2017/03/its-mengele-day/)

Lichtblau said in an interview that "Of all the survivors in the camps, only a few thousand came in the first year or so. A visa was a precious commodity, and there were immigration policymakers in Washington who were on record saying that they didn't think the Jews should be let in because they were 'lazy people' or 'entitled people' and they didn't want them in. But there were many, many thousands of Nazi collaborators who got visas to the U.S. while the survivors did not, even though they had been, for instance, the head of a Nazi concentration camp, the warden at a camp, or the secret police chief in Lithuania who signed the death warrants for people."[1]
---
To be continued...

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Will Williams
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Re: Let's Look at One Lying Washington Post Jew

Post by Will Williams » Sun Jan 31, 2021 1:58 pm

Now, let's look a little deeper into the highlighted paragraph of this two-time Pulitzer Prize winning Jew's Washington Post article:
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Derek Barsaleau was an Army specialist who served in Afghanistan, but he also kept up a proud allegiance to neo-Nazi groups, including the notorious National Alliance and the World Church of the Creator. He was never shy about voicing his beliefs to his fellow soldiers. The military “was rampant with white supremacists,” Barsaleau told me. Since then he has denounced that ideology and now works with an anti-hate group in Wisconsin. But he says the appeal of white supremacy to service members has only become more powerful in the last few years — thanks in part, he believes, to Donald Trump’s divisive racial rhetoric.
---

I can't speak to Mr. Barsaleau's claim to have had faithfulness or loyalty to the World Church of the Creator, but I can say categorically, and with certainty, that he never had any connection whatsoever to the National Alliance, and why.

Let's look at Eric Lichtblau's source for this information about this alleged former "hater" who supposedly denounced his hateful way and now works for an anti-hate group. Could it possibly be this three-year-old smear article:

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Ex-alt right member shares story of change
By Ryan Whisner rwhisner@dailyunion.com
Dec 12, 2017

Image

Image
Derek Barsaleau laments his hateful past with Dr. Ozelle Toms, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater professor and diversity coordinator. They are pictured above with Derek's daughter and other members of the mostly white members of the anti-hate group, The Unity Project.

Alt-right — a right-wing, primarily online political movement or grouping based in the U.S. whose members reject mainstream conservative politics and espouse estremist [sic] beliefts [sic] and policites [sic] typically centered on ideas of white nationalism.

From age 16 to 23, Derek Barsaleau was an active recruiter for the National Alliance, the National Socialists of America and the World Church of the Creator.

Believing in an ideology where the swastika remains a symbol of power and hate is way of life, he found a sense of belonging in a local skinhead group as a teen in Hampstead, N.C.

“As far as going out and terrorizing, that wasn’t my thing,” he said. “I was the guy that would draft more people into the cause.”


It took a life-changing moment while serving overseas that involved a black savior and subsequently the birth of his own children to change Barsaleau’s path forever.

Currently a Fort Atkinson resident, he shared his journey to the alt-right and subsequent reversal of his decision to support that ideology during a recent event sponsored by the Unity Project, a nonprofit organization focused on welcoming and accepting all community members.

During the gathering at the Hoard Historical Museum in Fort Atkinson, Barsaleau was interviewed by Dr. Ozalle Toms, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater professor and diversity coordinator.

Barsaleau walked with the Unity Project in Fort Atkinson’s holiday parade on Nov. 11.

Conversely, years ago, he would have been recruiting people to participate in the Aug. 12, 2017, rally in Charlottesville, Va., which led to street fights, brawling and the death of a counter-demonstrator when a car drove into a crowd.

Born and raised in Stafford Springs, Conn., Barsaleau was 13 years old when his family moved to Hampstead, N.C., just north of Wilmington, N.C.

“Growing up in northern Connecticut, it was not a very diverse town at all. I had no introduction to anyone that wasn’t white,” he said. “When I moved to North Carolina, I was instantly just hated because I was from the north.”

Barsaleau said he was bullied from the day he moved down to the day he left.

Rumors spread about him having AIDS, being a drug addict and any other of the nasty things teens could think of, he said.

“I had a very small group of friends in high school,” he said. “It was the most miserable time in my life and the only people that were willing to take me in was the local skinhead group.”


Barsaleau recognizes now that he was a textbook example of the alt-right’s ideal recruit.

“The top recruiting tool to this day is targeting outcasts, people who don’t belong, people with low self-esteem,” he said. “They are so much easier to influence. All you need to do is give them a sense of belonging and they’re all yours.”

During his time in high school in North Carolina, Barsaleau was the embodiment of those characteristics.

“They just gave me the sense of empowerment, a sense of belonging I was looking for,” Barsaleau said. “I was young when I moved down there and super-influential.”

For seven years, he followed the ideology of the alt-right. His family cut him off, his mother being the last to do so.

“She had hope, but eventually she knew that if I wasn’t going to grow on my own, I wasn’t going anywhere,” he said. “There was a point and time where I was absolutely on my own.”

His point of change came during his military service. It remains a difficult topic for him to discuss.

“It deals with one part of my life that I don’t normally talk about: my time in the Army,” Barsaleau said. “I met my absolute savior, who literally saved my life. He was black and that was really kind of the starting off point.”

He recalled that while having a rifle pointed at his own head, a fellow soldier managed to pull the trigger first, saving Barsaleau’s life.

“I began to feel that hate was just too big of a burden to carry through life,” Barsaleau said.

He returned to Connecticut, leaving the alt-right behind.

“Thankfully, I was still single and didn’t have a child, so I was able to go away for a little bit,” he said.

Occasionally via email he would receive threats suggesting that he was a “race traitor.”

“It really wasn’t that bad for me, but I do know of cases where people have ended up in the hospital or have been actually beaten to death,” he said. “It can be very hard to get out of something like that.”

When he already had that seed of doubt planted in him, his absolute breaking point was the birth of his first child.

“To this day, I know there are things I need to work on,” Barsaleau said. “I’m still not all the way there.”

“When people decide to leave the alt-right and come to this side, it’s like waking up one day and realizing that everything you thought about life is completely wrong. How would you feel if you woke up one day and you realized we don’t even live on Earth anymore, you we’re just a speck and the sky is purple?” he said. “Everything you do no longer exists.”

Barsaleau said the journey is an ongoing process.

“It is a lot of self-education, a lot of looking into yourself,” he said. “You need to stop pointing fingers and just realize you need to recognize your own biases and figure out how to address them.”

He said his personal focal point is his children.

“I parent by giving my children absolute independent thought while also teaching tolerance and acceptance,” Barsaleau said.

Unlike himself, the bullying by his children is not tolerated.

“If there is ever an instance where any of my kids is picking on anybody for any reason, there would be some pretty strong consequences,” he said. “They are very good kids and they respect that.”

While teaching them love and acceptance, Barsaleau said he also teaches them the reality of the world.

“I don’t shelter them from anything,” he said, noting that they have shared some of his personal experiences to help them grow and understand why hate is too heavy a burden to carry.

“They are aware of the world around them because this is the world and they are going to be taking over someday,” Barsaleau said. “It is vital they know what they are getting into as an adult. I think it is my primary job as a parent is to raise a self-sufficient, yet affectionate, adult. For myself, it is the biggest thing I can do besides looking into myself daily to understand my own biases toward whatever is to break the cycle and raise my children in the correct way.”

He knows that the change will not happen overnight.

“It is going to take generations for the cycle to be broken,” Barsaleau said. “It is a going to take far more than a couple of protests.”

Barsaleau said he does not have any contact with anyone from his years involved with the alt-right.

“Everybody I knew is either in jail, drunk or has died,” he said. “I was able to get past that. It is nothing I could ever think about all day.”

Responding to the concept that the alt-right has become normalized, Barsaleau disagreed.

“The movement itself is actually down from when I was a member in the late 1990s and early 2000s,” he said. “Social media and mainstream media have definitely projected it and our current administration has given it a platform where they feel it is OK to be more open.”

Continuing, the former alt-right supporter said those involved will use things like a free speech rallies or protests about a monument coming down as excuses and marketing ploys.

“They know the only reason they are going into a liberal city is to get people riled up and to cause violence, and when violence occurs, that brings more people to them because they are the non-violent protestors,” Barsaleau said. “It is all a marketing ploy and they have been given a national platform with the president and numerous people in the administration. I wouldn’t say it’s normalized, but it is more out in the open.”

For those concerned about people who are outcasts and might be leaning toward the alt-right, he said it is not about changing their minds.

“It is something they are going to have to find within themselves through self-reflection or a life-changing event,” Barsaleau said. “The best thing you can do is listen, engage and just talk.”

He emphasized the importance of not arguing with people with opposing views because that only reaffirms their beliefs.

“Even in a political debate, right versus left, if I were to get into a heated argument with a Donald Trump supporter right now, anything I said to them, the response would be ‘that’s a lie,” Barsaleau said. “It’s the same way in the neo-Nazi movement.”

He said the answer is to respect others’ points of view.

“You don’t have to accept it, but respect it and that is really the best way,” he said. “Violence is definitely not the answer in any way, shape or form.”

Barsaleau noted that violence is another recruiting tool for the alt-right groups. They want opposition to fight back so they can say they were there peacefully.

“The biggest thing is listening,” he said. “The best thing you can do is to embrace them and introduce them to more people who are non-toxic, introduce them to people of color, religion etc.”

Barsaleau said it is a challenge to not push too hard, but don’t let people who appear alone be alone.

He acknowledged still learning the process himself.

For instance, until about eight months ago, he was not a fan of the Black Lives Matter movement.

“When I actually began talking to people in that movement and working with them, I began to understand that it is not about rioting and looting; it is just about getting people to talk,” Barsaleau said. “It took me a long time, but I’m getting there.”

His journey to Wisconsin was for a female.

“I don’t like Wisconsin, but I love Fort Atkinson; it reminds me of home,” he said. “It is probably one of the strongest communities I have ever lived in.”

However, he admitted there is always a crack in the armor.

“All you can do is keep your eyes and ears open and when you hear somebody being called names, don’t stand idly by; you need to stand up,” Barsaleau said. “Talk to them. For somebody that can inflict that much pain on somebody else, there is obviously something going on in their own lives that they don’t want to confront. Fort Atkinson is in good shape, but it is always good to be vigilant.”

Earlier this year, Barsaleau was the lead organizer and founder of Wisconsin Progressive Alliance in Madison that quickly was recognized on the national scale. He said his group, along with a large number of other statewide and national organizations, believes that the only way the country can move forward is to stand united.

“The biggest thing about the resistance is burnout,” he said. “People try and do too much too fast.”

Barsaleau himself suffered from burnout for quite a while when the Wisconsin Progressive Alliance grew quickly.

“It is a marathon, not a sprint, and people fail to get that from the get-go,” he said.

After stepping away from the alliance, he found groups like Beloit Together and the Unity Project that were building stronger communities, just on a smaller scale.

“It will take groups like this, but all over the place, to make things happen,” Barsaleau said. “We can try and take what we do here and spread it from town to town to town. We need to do it on the local level.”

Church of the Creator is a Christian-faith based organization headquartered in Ashland, Oregon. After a legal battle, which culminated in a denied appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, the TE-TA-MA Truth Foundation Family of URI was awarded sole usage of the name "Church of the Creator," which had also been part of the name of the white supremacist group "World Church of the Creator." That group is now known as Creativity Movement and is not associated with the Oregon-based church, which registered the trademark for the name in 1982.
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https://www.dailyunion.com/news/ex-alt- ... 80b31.html

How many transparent, sloppy lies can the reader identify in this ridiculous, poorly written piece of "journalism" that the two-time Pulitzer Prize winning Washington Post journalist Erich Lichtblau sourced for his 29 January, 2021 Post smear piece?

How about for starters the claim in the concluding paragraph that Ben Klassen's anti-Christian Church of the Creator is a Christian-faith based organization.

I'll pick apart in a followup post this three-year-old Daily Union smear with what I know about our National Alliance that refutes the claims of this "ex-hater," Derek Barsaleau.

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Re: Let's Look at One Lying Washington Post Jew

Post by Will Williams » Tue Feb 02, 2021 12:15 pm

Will Williams wrote:
Sun Jan 31, 2021 1:58 pm
Now, let's look a little deeper into the highlighted paragraph of this two-time Pulitzer Prize winning Jew's Washington Post article:
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Derek Barsaleau was an Army specialist who served in Afghanistan, but he also kept up a proud allegiance to neo-Nazi groups, including the notorious National Alliance and the World Church of the Creator. He was never shy about voicing his beliefs to his fellow soldiers. The military “was rampant with white supremacists,” Barsaleau told me. Since then he has denounced that ideology and now works with an anti-hate group in Wisconsin. But he says the appeal of white supremacy to service members has only become more powerful in the last few years — thanks in part, he believes, to Donald Trump’s divisive racial rhetoric.
---

I can't speak to Mr. Barsaleau's claim to have had faithfulness or loyalty to the World Church of the Creator, but I can say categorically, and with certainty, that he never had any connection whatsoever to the National Alliance, and why.

Let's look at Eric Lichtblau's source for this information about this alleged former "hater" who supposedly denounced his hateful way and now works for an anti-hate group. Could it possibly be this three-year-old smear article:

---

Ex-alt right member shares story of change
By Ryan Whisner rwhisner@dailyunion.com
Dec 12, 2017

Image

Image
Derek Barsaleau laments his hateful past with Dr. Ozelle Toms, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater professor and diversity coordinator. They are pictured above with Derek's daughter and other members of the mostly white members of the anti-hate group, The Unity Project.

Alt-right — a right-wing, primarily online political movement or grouping based in the U.S. whose members reject mainstream conservative politics and espouse estremist [sic] beliefts [sic] and policites [sic] typically centered on ideas of white nationalism.

From age 16 to 23, Derek Barsaleau was an active recruiter for the National Alliance, the National Socialists of America and the World Church of the Creator.

[According to his profile -- https://www.mylife.com/derek-barsaleau/e38235421356 -- Barsaleau was born in 1981 so would have reached the age of 16 in 1997, a year when I was the National Alliance's Regional Coordinator for the Carolinas and frequently visited the Wilmington, NC area, where this fellow claimed to be an Alliance activist in Hampstead, just outside of Wilmington. We did NA bulk mailings to Hampstead specifically back then. Barsaleau lies about this supposed association with our Alliance in the 1990s. The National Alliance is an adult organization. No teenagers under the age of 18 have ever been "activists" for the National Alliance.

As for his claim to have been associated with Mat Hale's WCOTC, I can't speak to that. Its successor group The Creativity Movement is now defunct. I've never heard of the other group Barsaleau claimes to have been an "active recruiter" for, the National Socialists of America.]


Believing in an ideology where the swastika remains a symbol of power and hate is way of life, he found a sense of belonging in a local skinhead group as a teen in Hampstead, N.C.

[The swastika is not the symbol of the National Alliance and never has been. Nor was it ever the symbol of the Church of the Creator (COTC). There was a National Socialist Party of America back in the 1970s out of Chicago, headed by a Jewish queer, but that would have been well before young Barsaleau's time. That group is long gone, but would have probably used the swastika as its symbol.]

“As far as going out and terrorizing, that wasn’t my thing,” he said. “I was the guy that would draft more people into the cause.”

It took a life-changing moment while serving overseas that involved a black savior and subsequently the birth of his own children to change Barsaleau’s path forever.

Currently a Fort Atkinson resident, he shared his journey to the alt-right and subsequent reversal of his decision to support that ideology during a recent event sponsored by the Unity Project, a nonprofit organization focused on welcoming and accepting all community members.

[The National Alliance has never been associated with the so-called alt-right.]

During the gathering at the Hoard Historical Museum in Fort Atkinson, Barsaleau was interviewed by Dr. Ozalle Toms, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater professor and diversity coordinator.

Barsaleau walked with the Unity Project in Fort Atkinson’s holiday parade on Nov. 11.

Conversely, years ago, he would have been recruiting people to participate in the Aug. 12, 2017, rally in Charlottesville, Va., which led to street fights, brawling and the death of a counter-demonstrator when a car drove into a crowd.

[The National Alliance was not associated whatsoever with the 2017 rally in Charlottesville.]

Born and raised in Stafford Springs, Conn., Barsaleau was 13 years old when his family moved to Hampstead, N.C., just north of Wilmington, N.C.

“Growing up in northern Connecticut, it was not a very diverse town at all. I had no introduction to anyone that wasn’t white,” he said. “When I moved to North Carolina, I was instantly just hated because I was from the north.”

Barsaleau said he was bullied from the day he moved down to the day he left.

Rumors spread about him having AIDS, being a drug addict and any other of the nasty things teens could think of, he said.


[Just speculating, but if Barsaleau was "hated" in Hampstead it would not have been because he was from the north, but probably because he's an oddball sociopath, and likely because he's a homosexual who actually did do drugs at an early age.]

“I had a very small group of friends in high school,” he said. “It was the most miserable time in my life and the only people that were willing to take me in was the local skinhead group.”

Barsaleau recognizes now that he was a textbook example of the alt-right’s ideal recruit.

[Nonsense! It is doubtful any so-called skinhead group would have had anything to do with this creep.]

“The top recruiting tool to this day is targeting outcasts, people who don’t belong, people with low self-esteem,” he said. “They are so much easier to influence. All you need to do is give them a sense of belonging and they’re all yours.”

During his time in high school in North Carolina, Barsaleau was the embodiment of those characteristics.

“They just gave me the sense of empowerment, a sense of belonging I was looking for,” Barsaleau said. “I was young when I moved down there and super-influential.”

For seven years, he followed the ideology of the alt-right. His family cut him off, his mother being the last to do so.

[Good for her. The alt-right crowd, whoever they are, would have cut him off, too. Only a group like the Unity Project seeks out Sad Sacks like Mr. Barsaleau.]

“She had hope, but eventually she knew that if I wasn’t going to grow on my own, I wasn’t going anywhere,” he said. “There was a point and time where I was absolutely on my own.”

His point of change came during his military service. It remains a difficult topic for him to discuss.

[Oh, and the new unisex, multiracial military accepts defectives like Barsaleau these days, too.]

“It deals with one part of my life that I don’t normally talk about: my time in the Army,” Barsaleau said. “I met my absolute savior, who literally saved my life. He was black and that was really kind of the starting off point.”

He recalled that while having a rifle pointed at his own head, a fellow soldier managed to pull the trigger first, saving Barsaleau’s life.

“I began to feel that hate was just too big of a burden to carry through life,” Barsaleau said.

He returned to Connecticut, leaving the alt-right behind.

[Oh, was the alt-right active in his Army life?]

“Thankfully, I was still single and didn’t have a child, so I was able to go away for a little bit,” he said.

Occasionally via email he would receive threats suggesting that he was a “race traitor.”

“It really wasn’t that bad for me, but I do know of cases where people have ended up in the hospital or have been actually beaten to death,” he said. “It can be very hard to get out of something like that.”

[Who have those in the alt-right ever beaten to death? Name one. More lies from this sick individual in the Unity Project.]

When he already had that seed of doubt planted in him, his absolute breaking point was the birth of his first child.

“To this day, I know there are things I need to work on,” Barsaleau said. “I’m still not all the way there.”

“When people decide to leave the alt-right and come to this side, it’s like waking up one day and realizing that everything you thought about life is completely wrong. How would you feel if you woke up one day and you realized we don’t even live on Earth anymore, you we’re just a speck and the sky is purple?” he said. “Everything you do no longer exists.”

[He's hallucinating, still doing drugs.]

Barsaleau said the journey is an ongoing process.

“It is a lot of self-education, a lot of looking into yourself,” he said. “You need to stop pointing fingers and just realize you need to recognize your own biases and figure out how to address them.”

He said his personal focal point is his children.

“I parent by giving my children absolute independent thought while also teaching tolerance and acceptance,” Barsaleau said.

Unlike himself, the bullying by his children is not tolerated.

[He'll beat the snot out of any kid who bullies his children. :lol: ]

“If there is ever an instance where any of my kids is picking on anybody for any reason, there would be some pretty strong consequences,” he said. “They are very good kids and they respect that.”

While teaching them love and acceptance, Barsaleau said he also teaches them the reality of the world.

“I don’t shelter them from anything,” he said, noting that they have shared some of his personal experiences to help them grow and understand why hate is too heavy a burden to carry.

“They are aware of the world around them because this is the world and they are going to be taking over someday,” Barsaleau said. “It is vital they know what they are getting into as an adult. I think it is my primary job as a parent is to raise a self-sufficient, yet affectionate, adult. For myself, it is the biggest thing I can do besides looking into myself daily to understand my own biases toward whatever is to break the cycle and raise my children in the correct way.”

He knows that the change will not happen overnight.

“It is going to take generations for the cycle to be broken,” Barsaleau said. “It is a going to take far more than a couple of protests.”

Barsaleau said he does not have any contact with anyone from his years involved with the alt-right.

“Everybody I knew is either in jail, drunk or has died,” he said. “I was able to get past that. It is nothing I could ever think about all day.”

Responding to the concept that the alt-right has become normalized, Barsaleau disagreed.

“The movement itself is actually down from when I was a member in the late 1990s and early 2000s,” he said. “Social media and mainstream media have definitely projected it and our current administration has given it a platform where they feel it is OK to be more open.”

[I suppose he's talking about the Trump administration here. The Harris/Biden administration will squish those pesky alt-right youngsters like bugs.]

Continuing, the former alt-right supporter said those involved will use things like a free speech rallies or protests about a monument coming down as excuses and marketing ploys.

“They know the only reason they are going into a liberal city is to get people riled up and to cause violence, and when violence occurs, that brings more people to them because they are the non-violent protestors,” Barsaleau said. “It is all a marketing ploy and they have been given a national platform with the president and numerous people in the administration. I wouldn’t say it’s normalized, but it is more out in the open.”

[What a political genius! Barsaleau will go far with those civic-minded folks in the Unity Project.]

For those concerned about people who are outcasts and might be leaning toward the alt-right, he said it is not about changing their minds.

“It is something they are going to have to find within themselves through self-reflection or a life-changing event,” Barsaleau said. “The best thing you can do is listen, engage and just talk.”

He emphasized the importance of not arguing with people with opposing views because that only reaffirms their beliefs.

“Even in a political debate, right versus left, if I were to get into a heated argument with a Donald Trump supporter right now, anything I said to them, the response would be ‘that’s a lie,” Barsaleau said. “It’s the same way in the neo-Nazi movement.”

He said the answer is to respect others’ points of view.

“You don’t have to accept it, but respect it and that is really the best way,” he said. “Violence is definitely not the answer in any way, shape or form.”

Barsaleau noted that violence is another recruiting tool for the alt-right groups. They want opposition to fight back so they can say they were there peacefully.

“The biggest thing is listening,” he said. “The best thing you can do is to embrace them and introduce them to more people who are non-toxic, introduce them to people of color, religion etc.”

Barsaleau said it is a challenge to not push too hard, but don’t let people who appear alone be alone.

He acknowledged still learning the process himself.

For instance, until about eight months ago, he was not a fan of the Black Lives Matter movement.

“When I actually began talking to people in that movement and working with them, I began to understand that it is not about rioting and looting; it is just about getting people to talk,” Barsaleau said. “It took me a long time, but I’m getting there.”

His journey to Wisconsin was for a female.

[What a lucky girl. She may be hooked up with a future Nobel Peace Prize winner.]

“I don’t like Wisconsin, but I love Fort Atkinson; it reminds me of home,” he said. “It is probably one of the strongest communities I have ever lived in.”

However, he admitted there is always a crack in the armor.

“All you can do is keep your eyes and ears open and when you hear somebody being called names, don’t stand idly by; you need to stand up,” Barsaleau said. “Talk to them. For somebody that can inflict that much pain on somebody else, there is obviously something going on in their own lives that they don’t want to confront. Fort Atkinson is in good shape, but it is always good to be vigilant.”

Earlier this year, Barsaleau was the lead organizer and founder of Wisconsin Progressive Alliance in Madison that quickly was recognized on the national scale. He said his group, along with a large number of other statewide and national organizations, believes that the only way the country can move forward is to stand united.

“The biggest thing about the resistance is burnout,” he said. “People try and do too much too fast.”

Barsaleau himself suffered from burnout for quite a while when the Wisconsin Progressive Alliance grew quickly.

“It is a marathon, not a sprint, and people fail to get that from the get-go,” he said.

After stepping away from the alliance, he found groups like Beloit Together and the Unity Project that were building stronger communities, just on a smaller scale.

“It will take groups like this, but all over the place, to make things happen,” Barsaleau said. “We can try and take what we do here and spread it from town to town to town. We need to do it on the local level.”

Church of the Creator is a Christian-faith based organization headquartered in Ashland, Oregon. After a legal battle, which culminated in a denied appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, the TE-TA-MA Truth Foundation Family of URI was awarded sole usage of the name "Church of the Creator," which had also been part of the name of the white supremacist group "World Church of the Creator." That group is now known as Creativity Movement and is not associated with the Oregon-based church, which registered the trademark for the name in 1982.
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[Such obvious BS. The COTC, founded 1982 by Ben Klassen has always been strictly anti-Christian. The World Church of the Creator (WCOTC) was founded in 1994 and was not even a legitimate successor to the COTC. It's successor, The Creativity Movement (TCM) is now defunct. The only legitimate successor to Klassen's COTC is the Creativity Alliance, headquartered in Australia (creativityalliance.com).

So, now, you know the rest of the story.] It is doubtful that the Washington Post will retract or correct its phony tale about Mr. Barsaleau.]


https://www.dailyunion.com/news/ex-alt- ... 80b31.html

How many transparent, sloppy lies can the reader identify in this ridiculous, poorly written piece of "journalism" that the two-time Pulitzer Prize winning Washington Post journalist Erich Lichtblau sourced for his 29 January, 2021 Post smear piece?

How about for starters the claim in the concluding paragraph that Ben Klassen's anti-Christian Church of the Creator is a Christian-faith based organization.

I'll pick apart in a followup post this three-year-old Daily Union smear with what I know about our National Alliance that refutes the claims of this "ex-hater," Derek Barsaleau.
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OK, I've done so in red.

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