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Somebody has been in the news

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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Helena, MT has been in the news

PostThu Nov 22, 2018 2:18 am

https://helenair.com/news/local/white-n ... 87932.html

White nationalist group's Helena recruiting attempts quickly shut down
TYLER MANNING tyler.manning@helenair.com Oct 31, 2018

A white nationalist group known as Identity Evropa placed recruiting posters at Carroll College and Helena College late last week, but the materials didn't stay put for long.

Josh Manning, a Jewish U.S. Army veteran and human rights activist, said he and a friend quickly removed the posters from both campuses and burned them in his barbecue barrel.

“We saw the posters and thought ‘Oh hell no’,” Manning said.

The posters were hung just hours after the shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh that left 11 people dead, an incident that has been labeled as the deadliest attack on Jewish people in U.S. history.

“It’s not free speech, it's hate speech," Manning said. "It supports a war against certain races like mine.”

Officials from both colleges said hanging the posters without permission violated school policies.

The posters were taken down so quickly that it was difficult to find proof they’d been there at all. However, Identity Evropa has taken credit for bringing them to Helena and hanging them up at the schools.

Carroll College President John Cech released a statement saying “there is no place for hate at Carroll College.” He asked the campus community to report the appearance of any white nationalist posters or hate-promoting material to Dr. Jim Hardwick, vice president of student life, at jhardwic@carroll.edu or 406-447-4530.

Sarah Lawler, Carroll College’s director of public relations, said the college will be keeping an eye out in case any of these types of materials re-emerge.

Barb McAlmond, director of marketing and communications for Helena College, said posting flyers on the community boards is prohibited without her permission.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, Anti-Defamation League and Montana Human Rights Network all label Identity Evropa as a “white supremacist,” “white nationalist” or “hate group.”

“They were very visible in Charlottesville and were close to Richard Spencer,” said Keegan Hankes, senior research analyst at the law center. He was referring to the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, which left one person dead and several white supremacists being prosecuted.

Hankes said the group’s relationship with Spencer strained after a Michigan State University rally in which Spencer invited more obvious neo-Nazis.

“It complicated; the careful image they cultivate to appear normal,” Hankes said.

Posters like the ones in Helena are the standard operating method for Evropa. They target college-age white students and try to recruit them to their cause. They work carefully to cultivate an image of normalcy and distance themselves from the swastika-wearing variety of white supremacists.

“They brand themselves as ‘identitarians,’ which is from European far-right politics,” Hankes said. “They are very careful about curating their message to hide the white nationalist roots.”

Hankes said they are indicative of a more broad trend in the country. He said there are no exact numbers on their membership, but his guess would be a few hundred.

Rachel Carroll Rivas, co-director of the Montana Human Rights Network, backed up Hankes on their numbers.

“They are small in number of members and in influence in Montana,” Carroll Rivas said. “Clearly they aren’t interested in sharing their identities. We as communities rely on trust and these people don’t want to stand by what they allegedly believe so strongly in.”

Carroll Rivas said the Pacific Northwest has a long history of being a target for white nationalist activity. This is partly because of the rural nature of the communities, and because these groups can attempt to politicize their beliefs by doing things like running for office in sparsely populated areas.

The Montana Human Rights Network was formed in the late 1980s in response to militia and white nationalist groups.

“We work on how to fight it and come up with solutions that are better for our community,” Carroll Rivas said. “These beliefs hurt the community.”

Carroll Rivas said he doesn’t believe there is any significant population of Identity Evropa in Helena but the posting of flyers happens consistently in Billings.

“It can be difficult to unpack their coded language,” said Carroll Rivas. “They used anti-Semitic dog-whistles like ‘the global elite.’ However, when you get deeper into their organization they start talking about how the so-called ‘global elite’ are Jewish people.”

Carroll Rivas said anti-Semitic conspiracy theories are at the base of what groups like Evropa believe. “Last Saturday was the poorest choice of time to post the posters,” Carroll Rivas said. “But it’s a good thing that we had such a strong response here.”

Carroll Rivas said there have been more incidents involving white nationalists in the past two years than in her previous 10 years with Montana Human Rights Network. “We must associate their bigoted language with the actual acts of violence they bring,” Carroll Rivas said.

Identity Evropa rejects claims that it advocates for supremacy or violence. However, founder Nathan Damigo spent several years in jail for robbing a cab driver at gunpoint because he “thought he was Iraqi.” He was also caught on camera assaulting a woman at a protest in Berkeley last year. Damigo left the group shortly after the Charlottesville incident.

However, the group maintains a message of white nationalism and segregation of races.

When asked for a statement, Identity Evropa spokesperson Sam Harrington said the group believes “European Americans are being replaced as a result of mass immigration." Harrington went on to deny the various labels attributed to the group by SPLC, MHRN and ADL.

Montana Human Rights Network provides help to individuals and communities who experience hate crimes. Their website has a hate incident report form and a hate incident rapid response guide for those interested in the steps on how to address an incident.
Equating free speech with violence, the standard tactic devised by these Jewish-led presstitutes to outlaw speech the Jews don't like.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Emporia KS has been in the news

PostFri Nov 23, 2018 12:22 am

http://www.emporiagazette.com/latest_ne ... 4552f.html

White supremacist fliers unwelcome in area
By Lydia Kautz lydia@emporia.co Nov 21, 2018 Updated Nov 21, 2018

Editor’s note: One of the sources in this story preferred not to be identified. “John Smith,” who received an unwelcome white nationalist flier on his mailbox Friday, has had his name changed to protect his identity.

Several residents of Emporia and Strong City received an unpleasant surprise. Last week, fliers featuring links to white supremacist websites were attached to their mailboxes.

Chase County Sheriff Rich Dorneker said he was looking into the matter and trying to determine what the legality was concerning the distribution of the fliers. If the post office becomes involved in the prosecution, he said, the person responsible can be charged on a federal rather than just a local level.

The person responsible could potentially be charged with criminal trespassing, according to Dorneker, if no laws related to the postal system have been violated.

He said between six and 12 people reported finding the fliers.

“I know they hit Strong City. I didn’t have any reports out of Cottonwood (Falls),” Dorneker said.

He said local law enforcement and the postal service had both been made aware of the matter and that rural mail carriers had been notified

“We’re keeping an eye out for it,” Dorneker said.

He believes the person responsible might not be a local, because of the multiple different towns that were hit.

“So far, we have no additional information and no suspects,” Dorneker said.

Dorneker asked if anyone sees or hears anything suspicious that they report it to local law enforcement.

“Don’t try to stop the guy,” he said.

Lyon County Sheriff Jeff Cope hadn’t returned a call to his office by press time, but his office posted about the mailbox vandalism on the department’s Facebook.

“We have reports of people in Emporia putting items on mailboxes at residences,” the post read. “Please call law enforcement if you see this. The USPS needs proper access to mailboxes in order to deliver your mail properly.”

“John Smith” of Emporia found a copy of the flier, which everyone on his side of the street had received, tucked under the flag on his mailbox.

He said the fliers concerned him.

“Knowing that there’s this kind of racism in town — it makes me nervous,” Smith said. “Not so much for myself, but I’ve got a lot of neighbors that are Latino and I worry for them, you know?”

He said he hopes the appearance of these fliers doesn’t herald violence to come. However, he’s uncertain.

“With everything else that’s been happening in the country these days with the extremism that seems to be coming out of the woodwork, I couldn’t say for sure,” Smith said. “It is something that kind of makes me look over my shoulder when I go out.”

He said it worries him coming, as it does, on the heels of a controversy at Emporia State University. Several students of color received threats related to the near-impeachment of Associated Student Government Vice President Michaela Todd over a politically-charged Facebook post. An ASG meeting related to these issues was cancelled due to the threats.

“It makes me feel bad for this town,” Smith said.

He’s not the only one who feels the incident might be related to troubles at ESU.

Brie, an Emporia resident who received one of the fliers and who declined to give her last name, said she thought the two issues were connected.

“I think it was a little extra chilling that these fliers were distributed on the same day that everything was happening at ESU,” she said,

Brie said she felt “it would be a pretty strong coincidence” for the two issues to be completely unconnected.

In any event, it worries her that white supremacists have become so bold in recent years and she wonders, as white nationalist voices continue to grow louder, if it’s going to keep getting worse.

“I’m pretty sick to my stomach,” Brie said. “It’s just really creepy that white nationalism is on the rise again … It’s scary. You like to think that we’re past that in our civil history.”

Resident Tricia Tabares was worried at first when she found a flier — her husband and children are Hispanic, though she is white — but she’s no longer concerned now that she knows other communities received fliers as well. She had been afraid her family was being targeted because they’re mixed.

However, Tabares believes the fact that the fliers were found scattered throughout area communities indicates that the fliers were distributed completely at random.

“My husband’s cousin in California said they’re out there too,” she said.

Tabares isn’t scared so much as puzzled now. She’s not sure what the fliers were meant to accomplish — to her, they seem pointless.

“What is this going to change? What does this do?” Tabares asked. “This is just dumb.”

She said she feels dividing people by race is pointless and only serves to cause division.

“I’m not a color, I’m an American,” Tabares said.
Race isn't a color, it's a biological reality though it is often named after a color for the sake of satisfying simple minds.

As for dividing by race, we Whites are divided against each other, but Tabares hasn't considered that. Now, “This is just dumb.”
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Cleveland has been in the news

PostFri Nov 23, 2018 12:31 am

https://www.cleveland.com/education/201 ... ampus.html

Fliers linking to neo-Nazi site found on Case Western Reserve campus
Updated 2:02 PM; Posted 9:26 AM (22 November 2018--ed.)

By Evan MacDonald, cleveland.com emacdonald@cleveland.com
CLEVELAND, Ohio – Fliers containing links to a neo-Nazi website were found outside several Case Western Reserve University buildings, according to a police report.

The fliers found Tuesday morning contained links to the website for the Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi, white supremacist and Holocaust denial commentary and message board website, the police report says.

University employees found the fliers on exterior doors outside the Mather House, Howe House and Adelbert Hall, the police report says.

The CWRU police department checked security cameras in an attempt to determine who posted the fliers, but they were inconclusive, a university spokesman said.

“We condemn these posters as a cowardly attempt to intimidate and divide,” the university said in a statement. “Case Western Reserve continues to be committed to its core values of diversity and inclusion, and opposes prejudice and discrimination of all kinds.”

The Daily Stormer has been widely condemned for the rhetoric posted on its website. Earlier this month, a federal judge refused to dismiss a lawsuit that accuses the Daily Stormer of a “terror campaign” of online harassment against a Jewish real estate agent.

The Daily Stormer was also forced to change web hosts after it posted an article that mocked Heather Heyer, the woman killed last year at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The fliers were found weeks after Case Western Reserve officials removed two swastikas found in men’s bathroom stalls of a classroom building. Their discoveries caused Vice President of Student Affairs Lou Stark to pen a letter to students, strongly rebuking hateful symbols and threatening language.

“I am appalled by the cowardly malice the actions on our campus represent. Those who engage in such conduct should remember that it not only is contrary to our values, but also university policies,” Stark wrote.

Colleges across the U.S. have also seen a rise in anti-Semitic incidents on campus. The Anti-Defamation League reported a 57 percent increase in such incidents in 2017 compared to 2016 – the largest single-year increase since the ADL began tracking the data in the 1970s.

The Anti-Defamation League said last year that white supremacists launched an outreach effort to attract and recruit college students. Five incidents of supremacists targeting campuses in Ohio were listed in the ADL’s data, including two at Ohio State University and single events at Kent State, Miami and Ohio universities.
Do all these presstitutes worship the blatherings of Jews as Divine Writ?

Note that once again, the cops are involved to push the concept that displaying symbols coupled with a phony claim of a threat is somehow illegal. This isn't journalism, it's propaganda using lies cooked up and amplified by a university official and corrupt press!
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody in Missoula has been in the news

PostFri Nov 23, 2018 12:41 am

https://kpax.com/news/missoula-county/2 ... -billings/

Hate group moves west to Missoula after posting fliers in Billings
MTN News
11:44 am
November 21, 2018

BILLINGS – A group condemned by Montana State University-Billings for placing fliers that promote white supremacy on campus appears to be moving west across Montana.

Most recently Identity Evropa tweeted pictures of members posting fliers also at the University of Montana campus and at the Missoula Vietnam Veteran’s memorial.

The tweets were posted Tuesday at locations in the Missoula area, including one at the University of Montana campus in front of Washington Grizzly Stadium where a flier was placed on a nearby light pole.

The tweet reads: “Members of Identity Evropa in Montana went on a hike in the hills around Missoula. Afterward, they had lunch at a local restaurant and put up flyers and stickers at the University of Montana.”

There are other pictures also tweeted out around the campus with a picture of what appears to be a statue of a Confederate soldier on horseback and the words “Identity Evropa, European Greatness American Roots,” on the poster.

According to its website, Identify Evropa refers to itself as “an American Identitarian organization that its main goal is to create a better world for people of European heritage.”

Recently fliers from the group were found on campuses in Billings.

Communications Specialist at MSU-B Kelsi Gambill said Wednesday that all the fliers originally placed on campus have since been removed.

“They are not approved locations,” said Gambill, who directed Q2 News to a statement previously released by Chancellor Dr. Dan Edelman.

Montana State University Billings can confirm that posters from a group that has been identified as white nationalists have appeared on our university campus. The locations where the posters were placed are not approved locations per our Freedom of Expression Policy, thus the posters were removed.

The university does not condone the positions espoused by the organization that has distributed these posters. By drawing attention to this group it provides them far more legitimacy and credit than they deserve and plays into the very thing they desire, more attention.

MSUB does stand up every day in thoughtful, progressive, and steadfast manner to embrace diversity through policy, programs, and events. That is how we demonstrate that we are an open and welcoming campus.

We will continue to be vigilant regarding this very important matter as there is no place for hate at MSUB.

The fliers that appeared at the MSU-Billings campus showed a depiction of Uncle Sam and reads: “Thank you Veterans!” with Identify Evropa also printed on the flier.

That flier also appeared to be distributed in Missoula.

Identify Evropa claims to want to create a better world for people, “particularly in America, by peacefully effecting cultural change,” according to its website.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups in America, has identified Identity Evropa as a racist group.

“Identity Evropa is at the forefront of the racist ‘all right’s’ effort to recruit white, college-aged men and transform them into the fashionable new face of white nationalism,” the group said on their site.

SPLC said Identify Evrope was founded in 2016 in Alexandria, Virginia and also claims the group’s ideology aligns with White Nationalist.

“Rather than denigrating people of color, the campus-based organization focuses on raising white racial consciousness, building community-based on shared racial identity and intellectualizing white supremacist ideology,” SPLC writes on its website.

When asked if any fliers remained on campus Wednesday morning, Gambill said they have been removed because of the placement of them.

The MSU-Billings policy can be found here.

— Andrea Lutz reporting for MTN News
Another instance where the presstitute invokes his/her Jewish masters when making another "hate" story. It's like a broken record, but with the place names changed.

Also, there's no proof anyone moved from Billings to Missoula (a distance of 343 miles) to place flyers. That would be a lot of trouble--a good 12 hours round trip-- to go to just for a few pieces of paper!
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody in Urbana IL has been in the news

PostSat Nov 24, 2018 2:24 am

http://www.news-gazette.com/news/local/ ... nnels.html

Swastika graffiti found in one of UI's underground tunnels
Wed, 11/21/2018 - 7:25pm | Ben Zigterman

URBANA — A University of Illinois employee found a swastika painted in a basement tunnel on campus, the same week a white-supremacist group posed in front of the Alma Mater.

According to a UI police report, the swastika was found in a tunnel between the Roger Adams and Noyes laboratories east of the Quad.

"We are continuing to investigate this as a criminal-damage incident," said Pat Wade, spokesman for the police department. "Although we investigate these as criminal-damage incidents, we certainly recognize that the content of the message can create an environment where our campus community members feel targeted or unsafe.

"We are here to help foster a welcoming campus community, and we always encourage anyone who feels unsafe to let us know so we can address their concerns."

He said that tunnel wasn't in a restricted area and is used for passage between Noyes Laboratory, the Chemistry Annex and Roger Adams Laboratory.

Earlier this week, a group called Identity Evropa said its Illinois chapter visited the Urbana campus.

The Southern Poverty Law Center classifies it as a hate group that recruits on college campuses to form a "fashionable new face of white nationalism."

Its founder cited David Duke, a former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, as an inspiration and helped plan the 2017 Charlottesville, Va., rally where a woman was killed, according to the SPLC.

The group posted pictures Monday on Twitter of three people in front of the Alma Mater statue holding flags with the group's logo.

The group also posted a picture of a poster tacked to a campus bulletin board with the tagline: "European Roots American Greatness."

Wade said he has no way of knowing if the visit and posters are connected with the painted swastika.

"I'm aware of the posters only because I saw the social media posts myself, but that is not something that has been reported to UIPD, so I don't have any more information on those than you do," Wade said. "Without knowing who is behind the two incidents, it would be impossible to say whether they are directly related."

The incidents come a month after more than 200 stickers from a white-nationalist organization called Patriot Front were plastered on lampposts and signs around the UI campus.

The SPLC considers Patriot Front a hate group as well.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Mount Pleasant MI has been in the news

PostSat Nov 24, 2018 2:35 am

http://www.cm-life.com/article/2018/11/ ... -fall-2018

White nationalist literature found on bulletin boards, in classroom
The fliers appear to have been distributed by an outside organization
By Sara Kellner | Published 11/19/18 1:50pm

Sterling Heights senior Sarah Merrifield walked into Dow 135 for her fashion class Monday afternoon when she noticed some red, white and blue cards on the tables in the classroom.

“Some of the students saw them, but didn’t realize what they were,” she said. “We looked it up and realized it was a (Neo-)Nazi thing and then we all started freaking out.”

The posters included links to patriotfront.us and bloodandsoil.org. Both web addresses bring users to the Patriot Front website.

Patriot Front is a Texas-based white nationalist group, founded in 2017 by Thomas Rousseau.

The Associated Press defines white nationalists as people who “say that white people are a distinct nation deserving of protection, and therefore they demand special political, legal and territorial guarantees for whites.”

The manifesto on Patriot Front's website includes white nationalist phrasing such as:

"When our European ancestors first came to this savage continent they had a variety of purpose... From the varied nations and cultures of Europe a new nation was forged in the flames of conquest. E Pluribus Unum was the new creed that bound our people together with their pan-European identity as Americans. To be an American is to be a descendant of conquerors, pioneers, visionaries, and explorers. This unique identity was given to us by our ancestors, and this national spirit remains firmly rooted in our blood.

"An African, for example, may have lived, worked, and even been classed as a citizen in America for centuries, yet he is not American. He is, as he likely prefers to be labelled, an African in America. The same rule applies to others who are not of the founding stock of our people as well as to those who do not share the common unconscious that permeates throughout our greater civilization, and the European diaspora."

Merrifield said her professor, human environmental studies faculty member Ian Mull, took the fliers after class.

Mull said after class, he showed them to human environmental studies chairperson Tanya Domina. He and Domina contacted the Office of Civil Rights and Institutional Equity (OCRIE), the Office of the Provost, and Education and Human Services Interim Dean Elizabeth Kirby.

Across campus in the Health Professions building, Hillman senior Riley Appelgren noticed the same posters on bulletin boards along the first floor.

She was clocking in for her shift as an anatomy teaching assistant when she saw one of the fliers on the bulletin board by the clock-in station.

“Then I back-tracked and realized they were on another bulletin board,” she said. In total, she found eight posters on the first floor of the Health Professions building and took them all to the Center for Diversity and Inclusion.

Appelgren said she found a "blood and soil" poster last spring in the North Art Studio as well.

Assistant Director of University Communications Ari Harris said it appears the distribution of the fliers was done by an outside organization, one not affiliated with CMU.

"Their stances are not aligned with the values of Central Michigan University, including integrity, respect, compassion, inclusiveness and social responsibility," she said.

Harris said the cabinet discussed the matter during its bi-monthly meeting Monday morning and agreed to dispose of the literature.

“In this case involving an outside entity, university leaders are removing and disposing of the materials in question, no matter where they are found,” she said.

Lt. Cameron Wassman from the CMU Police Department said the first report of these cards was on Saturday, Nov. 17. Staff from Charles V. Park Library called to report finding them tucked in books in the library. Other locations that have been reported to CMU Police include the Dow Science Building, the Engineering and Technology Building, and several residence halls, said Wassman.

On social media, students also reported seeing the fliers in the Bovee University Center.

"Nothing rises to the level of being a crime," Wassman said.

Journalism department chair Tim Boudreau, who teaches a journalism class about first amendment and free speech, said the literature doesn't appear to be criminal.

"There were no threats made, no illegal ideas distributed," he said. "No laws appear to have been broken."

He said the first amendment protects a lot of speech, even if it's offensive.

"The answer to bad speech is better speech," he said. "Don't cower in the face of bigotry."

Boudreau said disposing of the cards is unfortunate because it's a form of censorship.

"If there are time, place, manner restrictions that are content-neutral, that's one thing," he said, "but you can't apply restrictions selectively."

Harris said flyers distributed in residence halls must go through an approval process, but these did not. Any fliers that don't receive prior approval will be taken down in residence halls. Fliers distributed in classrooms are at the discretion of faculty members.

She said students who see any materials related to Patriot Front can report them to leaders in the area, including faculty members, employees at information desk and offices, resident assistants or residence hall directors.

Students can also contact OCRIE, the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, the Counseling Center, Residence Life staff, or other staff if they need further assistance or support.

CMU Police are no longer investigating, since no crimes were committed. However, OCRIE is looking into it, Harris said.

As this was an outside organization, no disciplinary actions can be taken.
What they say: Answer one form of speech with another. What they do: censor the speech they don't like and push only their own speech through rule-making.
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Will Williams

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Re: Somebody from Helena, MT has been in the news

PostSat Nov 24, 2018 12:26 pm

Jim Mathias wrote:https://helenair.com/news/local/white-nationalist-group-s-helena-recruiting-attempts-quickly-shut-down/article_93724671-9a4b-50b7-b3d2-cbafe0087932.html

White nationalist group's Helena recruiting attempts quickly shut down
TYLER MANNING tyler.manning@helenair.com Oct 31, 2018

A white nationalist group known as Identity Evropa placed recruiting posters at Carroll College and Helena College... the group maintains a message of white nationalism and segregation of races.

So, Identity Europa is a White Segregationist organization? Who needs that?

NA says, geographical separation now.
Geographical separation tomorrow.
Geographical separation forever!
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Helena, MT has been in the news

PostSun Nov 25, 2018 2:39 am

Will Williams wrote:So, Identity Europa is a White Segregationist organization? Who needs that?
It's worse than that, Will. According to their website, Identity Evropa doesn't even want a segregated society; they simply want a supermajority of Whites in "our homelands," there being no mention of segregation in their website at all. It is hoped they'll come to their senses and realize that having any non-Whites in White homelands results in miscegenation and racial suicide/genocide of Whites. Since most of them are college-aged, now is the time for them to wake up to this before they themselves form interracial relationships and waste their breeding years. I expect the smarter ones will figure it out, but in the meantime they're leading many down a dead end road. The no-compromise territorial policy of the National Alliance is, as you mentioned (paraphrasing George Wallace, perhaps?) is the wisest course and inspires confidence.
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Will Williams

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Re: Somebody from Helena, MT has been in the news

PostSun Nov 25, 2018 1:20 pm

Jim Mathias wrote:
Will Williams wrote:So, Identity Europa is a White Segregationist organization? Who needs that?
It's worse than that, Will. According to their website, Identity Evropa doesn't even want a segregated society; they simply want a supermajority of Whites in "our homelands," there being no mention of segregation in their website at all. It is hoped they'll come to their senses and realize that having any non-Whites in White homelands results in miscegenation and racial suicide/genocide of Whites. Since most of them are college-aged, now is the time for them to wake up to this before they themselves form interracial relationships and waste their breeding years. I expect the smarter ones will figure it out, but in the meantime they're leading many down a dead end road. The no-compromise territorial policy of the National Alliance is, as you mentioned (paraphrasing George Wallace, perhaps?) is the wisest course and inspires confidence.

From a post of yours above:
Earlier this week, a group called Identity Evropa said its Illinois chapter visited the Urbana campus.The Southern Poverty Law Center classifies it as a hate group that recruits on college campuses to form a "fashionable new face of white nationalism." Its founder cited David Duke, a former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, as an inspiration and helped plan the 2017 Charlottesville, Va., rally where a woman was killed, according to the SPLC...


"The SPLC classifies"; "according to the SPLC"...

What racially conscious, responsible White person today cares what the SPLC says? I believe SPLC classifies Identity Europa somewhat accurately as the self-styled "new face of WN" (but still a hate group :lol: ) Kinder, gentler, just wanting racial segregation. How did racial segregation work out for the scoundrel George Wallace? For South Africa? For the United States?

SPLC would lump the National Alliance in with everyone from the alt-right Inentity Europeans to the Aryan Brotherhood prison gang. That is their job. Last week media like the one quoted above were trying to associate us with the shooter in Pittsburgh, Mr. Bowers, always citing the SPLC "hate" watchdogs.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Toronto has been in the news

PostWed Nov 28, 2018 2:05 am

https://news.vice.com/en_ca/article/7xy ... e-genocide

WHITE NATIONALIST POSTS PHOTOS OF RACIALLY DIVERSE TORONTO SCHOOL CHILDREN TO “PROVE” WHITE GENOCIDE

By Steven Zhou Nov 21, 2018
Parents living in Toronto’s East End are worried after a noted white supremacist posted two photos online of children who attend schools in the region.

Late last month, Ronny Cameron, a Toronto man who openly identifies as a racist white nationalist, posted a photo of a class of kindergarteners on his public Facebook page, with the caption, “This is what classrooms in Toronto look like now. Do you understand why I’m concerned about population replacement???”

The photo shows a group of children posing for their class picture, in an undisclosed school, with their teacher. The vast majority of children in the photo are not white.

Several days later, Cameron uploaded a YouTube video featuring the same photo to drive the point home. The video, called “Replaced,” also features another photo of children, this time in a Scarborough high school. Both are used by him to illustrate how, according to him, white people are being bred out by immigrants of colour. Unlike his post of the kindergarten photo, the video prominently features the high school’s name.

The idea of “white genocide” is a neo-Nazi and white nationalist conspiracy theory alleging the deliberate and gradual marginalization, replacement, or liquidation of white people in countries where they are the majority. Immigration is often framed by white supremacists as a central method by which this process is pushed forward.

The photo of kindergarteners received lots of attention online. It was reposted to numerous Facebook groups, including ones run by anti-racist activists. For example, a post about Cameron’s antics ended up on a group called East Toronto Your Modern Village and ended up generating over 350 comments. The same happened on a number of other groups, such as buy-and-sell groups catering to Toronto’s East End. This later resulted in numerous complaints against Cameron on Facebook, YouTube, and elsewhere.

Many parents, some of whom have children going to one of the two schools targeted by Cameron, began to worry that exposing the faces of the kids (along with the identity of at least one of the two schools), would end up sparking violence.

The sole suspect for the mass shooting in Pittsburgh, where 11 Jewish congregants were murdered, propagated the online conspiracy theory that Jewish refugee workers are letting terrorists into the U.S. Many parents are afraid that Cameron’s behaviour could lead to something similar.

“The TDSB finds these posts completely unacceptable and has done everything in its power to have them removed.”
After an initial barrage of criticism, Cameron decided to respond by blurring out the faces of the kindergartners. This did little to appease parents who wanted the incident to be investigated and for the photos to be taken down. The Toronto District School Board (TDSB) was soon notified of Cameron’s posts and alerted both schools.

“We’re aware of these posts and the impacted school has been notified,” TDSB spokesperson Ryan Bird told VICE News. “We have also notified Toronto Police and have reported the posts to the social media platforms where they’re located. The TDSB finds these posts completely unacceptable and has done everything in its power to have them removed.” Principals at both schools refused to comment on the matter.

As of now, Cameron’s posts on Facebook and YouTube haven’t been taken down. In a statement to Vice News, Facebook says that the kindergarten post simply doesn’t violate their community standards, while Youtube states that, although they’ve severely restricted Cameron’s video, they won’t remove it since it doesn’t involve a direct call to violence.

“I saw the blurry photo and at first I didn't recognize it, but after a second look I realized it was from my son's school,” one mother, who saw the post on a Facebook group for Scarborough mothers, told VICE News. She says she immediately spoke to the principal and was told that the school had already taken action. She says that the kindergarten class got a letter from the administration explaining what had transpired.

“As a parent I am appalled by this happening to these children, especially by a hate monger. I hope this never happens again,” said the mother, who asked that her name not be used in the story.

“As a parent I am appalled by this happening to these children, especially by a hate monger.”
“This community is extremely diverse, as is most of Scarborough and it was disheartening in addition to terrifying to see this white supremacist hit so close to home,” Joy Henderson, a youth worker in Scarborough who lives close to the schools told VICE News. “The high school is on the shortlist for my son and it’s literally five minutes away from our home and about seven other elementary schools.”

In a public Facebook post, Henderson further expressed her frustration with the situation: “I am exhausted, but I can't sleep because some alt right asshole is using his platform to stir up racial hatred towards children in schools in my area...my heart is racing, the tears are flowing and my mind will not turn off of all the horrible possibilities.”

Henderson was first alerted to Cameron’s kindergarten post by her friend Anna (not her real name), another mom in the area who saw someone address the incident on an anti-racist Facebook group. In the comments to that latter post, someone posted a screenshot of another woman’s comments to Cameron’s original kindergarten photo post. The woman, who is white, appears to be both an acquaintance of Cameron’s and also the owner of the photo. Her daughter appears in the photo.

“Ronny, I’ll have to ask you to take down the pic now,” the woman writes under Cameron’s post. “Didn’t know how many would be sharing this pic across the globe.” This and other comments where she says she “agree[s] with the majority of” what Cameron has to say prompted a lot of people to accuse her of willingly giving Cameron the photo in the first place. One of her later comments shows her calling for the faces of the kindergarteners to be blurred, as opposed to her original request for the picture to be taken down altogether.

Anna later called out the woman, who she discovered was part of a Beaches buy and sell group, for allegedly passing on the photo to Cameron. The post generated a lot of attention.


“I later posted about this in a separate parenting group I belonged to and there was complete outrage,” Anna says. “I believe over 500 people reported the post and Cameron’s page over the course of a couple of days, with many also calling police and the TDSB.”

The photo’s owner ended up deleting her Facebook profile, while switching to a new one with a different name. When reached for comment, her fiance responded angrily that Cameron is all to blame. He says that Cameron took the photo from her original Facebook profile without permission, and that his fiance had nothing to do with the incident.

The incident has galvanized the attention of parents (especially mothers) who have become more alert about the discrimination that exists in parts of their communities. But it has also made many of them much more nervous about their surroundings.

“I’m generally on edge sending my kid to school and showed him a picture of the guy so he can alert a teacher if he sees him,” says Kimberley H-F, whose son attends the high school featured in the YouTube video.

“I’m happy where I live and I’m glad my kids have friends of all races, religions and cultures. And if that racist bastard doesn’t like it, he can move,” she says.
So typical of these presstitutes to equate those who communicate White genocide with the Pittsburgh shooting of some old Jews.
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