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Somebody has been in the news

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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody at EWU has been in the news

PostSun Oct 28, 2018 10:45 pm

https://easterneronline.com/43899/news/ ... ment-50508

White-supremacist flyers return to EWU

By Kaisa Siipola, Reporter
October 25, 2018
Filed under News

When flyers and stickers hung by a white-supremacist group appeared on campus in February, EWU students and faculty gathered for a student-led unity rally.

Now, the flyers have returned.

In the last couple of weeks, Identity Evropa stickers have been hung around campus during the middle of the night.

The EWU Police Department has been taking a police report on when, where and how frequent the stickers have been appearing, according to Jay Day, deputy chief of police.

Some students found it disappointing to see the stickers appearing on campus.

“As a trans student, seeing Identity Evropa stickers and flyers around campus makes me feel genuinely unsafe, especially when it’s not just around campus but also around Cheney because they live here,” EWU student Alexander Brooks said. “I wish they would stop putting them up because it makes students feel unsafe, whether they’re trans, queer, or students of color.”

“We are an educational institution and we believe the diversity is infused in the core of who we are, and we are going to value those differences, always,” said Dr. Shari Clark, EWU’s vice president of diversity and inclusion.

Various resources on campus, including the Multicultural Center and Counseling Psychological Services, are available to students and faculty for support and guidance.

The EWU police department encourages anyone who sees these stickers to call the non-emergency phone number at 509-359-7676.
Yes! You can post replies here (though their censors might not allow you to state the facts or other politically incorrect information) and even call the police and tell them what you think about the administration's heavy-handed response in using the police to cause legal headaches to free speech activists.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody in Lakeville MN has been in the news

PostSun Oct 28, 2018 11:14 pm

https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2018/10/ ... lakeville/
Cops here have very little to do, apparently.

Police Investigate Fliers Bearing Swastika Symbol Found At Lakeville Business

October 28, 2018 at 12:09 pm

LAKEVILLE, Minn. (WCCO) — Police in Lakeville are investigating after several homemade fliers bearing a swastika symbol and inflammatory language were found in the parking lot of a local business.

The Lakeville Police Department told WCCO the fliers were distributed without the permission of the business.

“These hateful messages do not represent the community values of Lakeville residents or our business community and will not be tolerated,” the statement read.

Authorities are asking anyone with information about the fliers to contact the police department at 952-985-2800.

Police say any tips should be phoned in directly to that number, as the department’s social channels are not constantly monitored.
You can leave a comment there, but only if you're a certified, politically vetted member of fakebook or twits-R-us
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PhuBai68

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"It's okay to be •••

PostMon Oct 29, 2018 8:06 pm

••• Black"

••• Hispanic"

••• Native American"

••• Mestizo"


So think that there would be any problems IF any posters/pamphlets being distributed on campus with any of those mentioned above?
Yet we have this •••

"the school condemns the activity in the strongest possible terms”



https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/camp ... -on-campus

https://thestarphoenix.com/pmn/news-pmn ... 4b97455d67
It's not diversity, it's displacement.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: "It's okay to be •••

PostTue Oct 30, 2018 2:02 am

PhuBai68 wrote:••• Black"

••• Hispanic"

••• Native American"

••• Mestizo"


So think that there would be any problems IF any posters/pamphlets being distributed on campus with any of those mentioned above?
Yet we have this •••

"the school condemns the activity in the strongest possible terms”



https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/camp ... -on-campus

https://thestarphoenix.com/pmn/news-pmn ... 4b97455d67
Schools, police, government, talking heads on tee vee, all of them condemn White existence and expression. It's their Pavlovian response taught to them by their Jewish Masters.
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Our self-appointed enemies have our name on their lips

PostTue Oct 30, 2018 2:22 am

https://www.ourquadcities.com/news/root ... redirect=1

Rooting out hate the goal on One Human Family
By: Shawn Loging
Posted: Oct 29, 2018 06:54 PM CDT

Updated: Oct 29, 2018 06:54 PM CDT

Davenport, Iowa -



The heartbreak in Pittsburgh has come to show attacks on members of the Jewish community aren’t isolated.

It’s as reports of anti-Semitic incidents more than double last year in the United States.

That has some in the Quad Cities working to stop hate of any kind.

Since March 2017, One Human Family of the Q-C-A has helped victims connect with resources and tracked incidents of harassment and intimidation based on someone’s faith, gender, race and other characteristics.

The term hate incidents can mean something beyond just a crime.

A founder of One Human Family told Local Four News, it helps them see a bigger picture of the issue that spans name-calling, vandalism and assault.

Rabbi Henry Karp said, “I just took the flu vaccine to avoid getting sick. We need to vaccinate ourselves against hate.”

Hate is an infection Rabbi Henry Karp told Local Four News is small in the Quad Cities community.

Rabbi Karp said, “Even though they exist in this community, the overwhelming majority of Quad Citians embraces diversity.”

But to show it’s not welcomed at all.

Rabbi Karp said, “We are all lessened by discrimination, hate, bigotry directed against anyone.”

One Human Family of the QCA started about a year and a half taking a closer look at the issue.

Rabbi Karp said, “We have had very few major hate incidents that have been reported to us.”

But Rabbi Karp said they know not all incidents hate are reported to them.

Rabbi Karp said, “They don’t immediately report it because they feel diminished by it. They feel vulnerable by it because they’re traumatized by it.”

He said the most pronounced incident in the Quad Cities had been the distribution of white supremacist flyers by the group National Alliance.

This isn’t an effort One Human Family works on alone, partnering with organizations United Way of the Quad Cities to give victims help.

United Way COO Karrie Abbott said, “211 is an information and referral line.”

The three-digit number is designed to connect residents in Rock Island and Scott Counties with health and human service providers.

Abbott said, “They will help you with what your immediate need is but also maybe ask some other questions to help connect you with resources that you didn’t even know you might be eligible for.”

For Rabbi Karp, truly inoculating against hate goes beyond knowing it’s happening but standing up and speaking out.

Rabbi Karp said, “We have to actively get involved. Every single one of us in making that statement and protecting others.”

Rabbi Karp also told Local Four News, the goal is to increase awareness about the reporting program.

To file a report, visit http://www.onehumanfamilyqca.org/hate-i ... orting.php

For resources, dial 211 or 563-355-9900.

One Human Family has also developed a list of actions people can take.

Rabbi Karp also said they're planning an expansion to their sign campaign that will be announced next month.

The Anti-Defamation League reports in their 2017 Audit there were about 2,000 anti-Semitic incidents across the country with about 50 in Illinois and 9 in Iowa.
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PhuBai68

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Re: Somebody has been in the news

PostTue Oct 30, 2018 2:00 pm

Has anyone noticed the double standard happening here?

Israel is "a Jewish state" - a nation established just for Jews.
Jews anywhere in the world can immigrate to the Jewish nation (except maybe black Jews).
Wouldn't this be "Jewish nationalism" wanting a country just for Jews?


Jewish leaders to Trump: Don't come until you denounce white nationalism

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... 805115002/
It's not diversity, it's displacement.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody has been in the news

PostThu Nov 01, 2018 12:38 am

https://decaturish.com/2018/10/dekalb-p ... community/

In another article where the ADL was quoted, this one involves equating Klan flyering activity with the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting.
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Re: Somebody from Roanoke has been in the news

PostThu Nov 01, 2018 12:43 am

https://www.roanoke.com/news/education/ ... 7008c.html

W&L condemns hate group's flyers found on campus
By Alison Graham alison.graham@roanoke.com 540-981-3324 Oct 29, 2018

Correction
Oct. 30, 2018, 12:15 p.m.: Washington and Lee University’s Commission on Institutional History and Community recommend that the university retain its present name including the reference to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The originally published version of this story incorrectly reported the commission's recommendation and has been updated.

Washington and Lee University students found Ku Klux Klan flyers around campus and on parked cars late last week.

University President Will Dudley sent a letter to students and faculty Friday acknowledging the leafleting that occurred on and around the Lexington campus.

“The views espoused by the KKK and other hate groups are abhorrent and antithetical to the values of Washington and Lee,” Dudley wrote. “The safety of our students and employees is our top priority.”

The university’s public safety office is coordinating with local law enforcement to investigate the situation and take any necessary precautions.

Students and residents shared photos of the KKK flyers on social media. One leaflet said, “K-K-Keep the name the same,” referring to the university’s Commission on Institutional History and Community, which studied whether W&L should change its name to no longer espouse Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Ultimately the commission recommended the university retain its name.

Dudley released a statement in August that the university will keep its name.

This is not the first time KKK flyers have been found in Lexington. Flyers were placed around town following the Red Hen incident, when the owner of local restaurant the Red Hen asked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave the establishment.

The flyers at that time read, “Boycott the Red Hen” and demanded people “penalize anyone who disgraces white womanhood.” The flyers specifically called for people to remember Gens. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson in the Confederate army and included the Confederacy’s national motto, “Deo vindice.”

The flyers found Friday also included the Confederate motto, which means “with God as our protector.”

KKK flyers have also been found around Lee-Jackson Day in January, when residents celebrate the generals and also Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Earlier this month anti-Semitic flyers were found posted on utility poles on the Roanoke College campus in Salem. College President Michael Maxey condemned the flyers as “antithetical to our Roanoke College values.”
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Re: Somebody from Rutgers has been in the news

PostThu Nov 01, 2018 1:14 am

https://www.nj.com/education/2017/10/wh ... rs_ac.html

White supremacist group posts recruiting fliers across Rutgers campuses
Updated Oct 24, 2017; Posted Oct 24, 2017

A screen shot of the Twitter account of the white supremacist group Identity Evropa showing one of the recruiting posters the group says it hung outside of Voorhees Chapel at Rutgers University in New Brunswick. Similar posters were found across the New Brunswick and Piscataway campuses Monday. (Twitter)
A screen shot of the Twitter account of the white supremacist group Identity Evropa showing one of the recruiting posters the group says it hung outside of Voorhees Chapel at Rutgers University in New Brunswick. Similar posters were found across the New Brunswick and Piscataway campuses Monday. (Twitter)

By Kelly Heyboer kheyboer@njadvancemedia.com,
NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

NEW BRUNSWICK -- Recruiting fliers posted by a white supremacist group were hung across Rutgers University's New Brunswick and Piscataway campuses Monday, university officials said.

The fliers promoting Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group that has been recruiting on college campuses across the country this fall, were posted on walls and in campus buildings.

Some of the posters said "Our Generation. Our Future. Our Last Chance." over a photo of group members and the Identity Evropa's website.

Identity Evropa's Twitter account included photos of fliers posted in front of prominent Rutgers buildings, including Voorhees Chapel on the Douglass campus in New Brunswick and the Rutgers Business School building on the Livingston campus in Piscataway.

The posters were eventually removed from all campus buildings and vehicles because the group is not a recognized university organization and the fliers violated Rutgers' posting rules, campus officials said.

The Daily Targum, the campus newspaper, also reported a handwritten "Black Lives Don't Matter" sign was found on a campus bus Monday, though it is unclear if it was related to the Identity Evropa recruiting posters.

In a statement released Tuesday, Identity Evropa said its members put up the recruitment posters, but the group was not responsible for the Black Lives Don't Matter sign on the Rutgers bus.

"Our posters we're (sic) placed at Rutgers as that university is a public university. Identity Evropa, however, is not responsible for any other material that may have emerged on campus in the following hours," the statement said.

Rutgers officials released a statement condemning the white nationalist messages posted on the campus.

"Rutgers University-New Brunswick condemns all acts and statements of bigotry, racism, anti-Semitism and white supremacy, which have no place in our society or on our campus. The flyers -- and the handwritten sign found on a campus bus -- do not represent the principles and values of the university, which include diversity, inclusivity and respect for people of all backgrounds," the Rutgers statement said.

In June, the state Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness listed Indentity Evropa as part of the "New Generation of White Supremacy" in a report on the ways similar groups are rebranding themselves to appeal to new audiences.

The Southern Poverty Law Center describes Identity Evropa as a white nationalist group whose members "peddle the delusion of white genocide." The group, which does not admit Jews as members, was part of the high-profile protests against the removal of Confederate statues in Charlottesville, Virginia, earlier this year.

Identity Evropa's founder, former Marine Nathan Damigo, has close ties to outspoken white nationalist Richard Spencer, the Southern Poverty Law Center said.

The group has stepped up recruitment efforts this year, calling its campaign to hang posters and sign up new members on college campuses #ProjectSeige. The group also put up posters at Stockton University in Galloway in September.

The purpose of the campaign is to get white students to question what they are being taught in college, the group said.

"As students then begin to realize that the direction their lectures take them is based upon false assumptions by their instructors, they will begin rejecting the false narratives and begin looking to us for answers," Identity Evropa said on its website.

Since March, there have been white supremacist flier incidents on 241 college campuses across the country, according to Southern Poverty Law Center's tracker. The majority of those incidents were traced to Identity Evropa.
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Re: Somebody from Kirkland WA has been in the news

PostSat Nov 03, 2018 2:11 am

https://www.kirklandreporter.com/news/m ... -kirkland/

<picture of poster attached to a light pole shown> An example of the neo-Nazi propaganda which appeared recently in Kirkland. Posters like these are put up by the far-right group Patriot Front which can be removed or covered up by residents. Contributed photo


Mayor, religion leaders respond to hate group fliers posted around Kirkland
The fliers advertised the same organization that distributed fliers in bags with candy around Bellevue in June.

By Aaron Kunkler
Thursday, November 1, 2018 1:30pm

Neo-Nazi propaganda has popped up in another Eastside city after originally being spread around neighborhoods earlier this year.

The most recent fliers were found in October, posted on street poles in Kirkland. They were advertising the same organization that distributed fliers in bags with candy around Bellevue in June. The poster for Patriot Front found in Kirkland encouraged “patriots” to “reconquer your birthright and forge a new America.”

Patriot Front is a an organization that is listed by It’s Going Down and the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group. The organization is a splinter group from a lager neo-Nazi organization known as Vanguard America, which saw one of its members accused of murder after he allegedly drove his car into protesters during a 2017 Unite the Right rally.

In response to the Kirkland fliers, the Greater Kirkland Ecumenical Parish issued a statement condemning them, signed by seven ministers.

“The posting of fliers of this sort is an affront to the values of our community and our faiths, and we are compelled by our faith to speak out and work to counter the seeds of discord, hatred, fear and intimidation that these fliers promote,” the statement read. “…Rather than merely ignoring these posters and hoping that racism and hatred will fail to find a foothold in Kirkland, our faith calls us to respond.”

Kirkland mayor Amy Walen also issued a response letter to the posters. In it, the mayor states that “hate has no home in Kirkland.” Kirkland’s City Council proclaimed the city a safe, inclusive and welcoming city for all residents in January 2017 and Walen said it is committed to protecting all residents without discrimination.

“As your Mayor, and as your neighbor, I ask that you please join me in condemning this type of conduct,” she wrote.

A growing body of evidence is beginning to confirm what anti-Nazi activists have been saying in recent years: that right-wing violence is increasing in the United States. A report released earlier this year by the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism found that over the last decade, right-wing extremism of all types was responsible for 71 percent of the 387 domestic extremist-related killings nationwide.

Around 23 percent of the total came from Islamic extremism and around three percent came from other extremists in 2017. During the same year, white supremacists were responsible for 18 of the 34 extremist-related murders, or 59 percent, compared to the 20 percent seen in 2016.

In total, 2017 was the fifth deadliest year for domestic extremist violence since 1970, but overall much lower than in the previous two years. In 2015 and 2016, large shooting sprees, including those at Pulse Night Club and the Inland Regional Center in San Bernadino committed by Islamic extremists boosted the death tolls in those years. Additionally, white supremacist Dylann Roof killed nine at a Charleston church in 2015. The deadliest domestic terrorist incident on record is still the Oklahoma City bombing committed by right-wing extremist Timothy McVeigh in 1995.

“These statistics illustrate that extremist-related killings comprise only a small fraction of the total number of homicides in the United States each year. Nevertheless, because of their nature, they can often have an outsized impact, affecting entire communities — or even the entire country — in ways many other deaths may not,” the report read.

Other extremist violence has been felt closer to home. In May 2017, white supremacist Jeremy Christian stabbed three people on a Portland MAX train, killing two, after going on a racist tirade against two women who he thought were Muslim, The Oregonian reported. Christian had been seen at Patriot Prayer rallies in the months before the stabbing. Patriot Prayer is a right-wing organization focused around its founder Joey Gibson, who recently ran in for Congress in Southwest Washington. Patriot Prayer has been accused of courting white supremacists and provoking violence at their rallies.

The extremist street fighting group known as the Proud Boys has also made national headlines in October after their members brutally attacked counter protesters, leading to multiple arrests, Newsweek reported. The attacks came after Proud Boy founder Gavin McInnes gave a two-hour speech paying tribute to the assassination of a Japanese Socialist Party leader. The New York Police Department has arrest five of the nine Proud Boys they are looking for, and have already charged several with felonies.


An example of the neo-Nazi propaganda which appeared recently in Kirkland. Posters like these are put up by the far-right group Patriot Front which can be removed or covered up by residents. Contributed photo
An example of the neo-Nazi propaganda which appeared recently in Kirkland. Posters like these are put up by the far-right group Patriot Front which can be removed or covered up by residents. Contributed photo


Mayor, religion leaders respond to hate group fliers posted around Kirkland
The fliers advertised the same organization that distributed fliers in bags with candy around Bellevue in June.

By Aaron Kunkler
Thursday, November 1, 2018 1:30pmNEWS

Neo-Nazi propaganda has popped up in another Eastside city after originally being spread around neighborhoods earlier this year.

The most recent fliers were found in October, posted on street poles in Kirkland. They were advertising the same organization that distributed fliers in bags with candy around Bellevue in June. The poster for Patriot Front found in Kirkland encouraged “patriots” to “reconquer your birthright and forge a new America.”

Patriot Front is a an organization that is listed by It’s Going Down and the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group. The organization is a splinter group from a lager neo-Nazi organization known as Vanguard America, which saw one of its members accused of murder after he allegedly drove his car into protesters during a 2017 Unite the Right rally.

In response to the Kirkland fliers, the Greater Kirkland Ecumenical Parish issued a statement condemning them, signed by seven ministers.

“The posting of fliers of this sort is an affront to the values of our community and our faiths, and we are compelled by our faith to speak out and work to counter the seeds of discord, hatred, fear and intimidation that these fliers promote,” the statement read. “…Rather than merely ignoring these posters and hoping that racism and hatred will fail to find a foothold in Kirkland, our faith calls us to respond.”

Kirkland mayor Amy Walen also issued a response letter to the posters. In it, the mayor states that “hate has no home in Kirkland.” Kirkland’s City Council proclaimed the city a safe, inclusive and welcoming city for all residents in January 2017 and Walen said it is committed to protecting all residents without discrimination.

“As your Mayor, and as your neighbor, I ask that you please join me in condemning this type of conduct,” she wrote.

A growing body of evidence is beginning to confirm what anti-Nazi activists have been saying in recent years: that right-wing violence is increasing in the United States. A report released earlier this year by the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism found that over the last decade, right-wing extremism of all types was responsible for 71 percent of the 387 domestic extremist-related killings nationwide.

Around 23 percent of the total came from Islamic extremism and around three percent came from other extremists in 2017. During the same year, white supremacists were responsible for 18 of the 34 extremist-related murders, or 59 percent, compared to the 20 percent seen in 2016.

In total, 2017 was the fifth deadliest year for domestic extremist violence since 1970, but overall much lower than in the previous two years. In 2015 and 2016, large shooting sprees, including those at Pulse Night Club and the Inland Regional Center in San Bernadino committed by Islamic extremists boosted the death tolls in those years. Additionally, white supremacist Dylann Roof killed nine at a Charleston church in 2015. The deadliest domestic terrorist incident on record is still the Oklahoma City bombing committed by right-wing extremist Timothy McVeigh in 1995.

“These statistics illustrate that extremist-related killings comprise only a small fraction of the total number of homicides in the United States each year. Nevertheless, because of their nature, they can often have an outsized impact, affecting entire communities — or even the entire country — in ways many other deaths may not,” the report read.

Other extremist violence has been felt closer to home. In May 2017, white supremacist Jeremy Christian stabbed three people on a Portland MAX train, killing two, after going on a racist tirade against two women who he thought were Muslim, The Oregonian reported. Christian had been seen at Patriot Prayer rallies in the months before the stabbing. Patriot Prayer is a right-wing organization focused around its founder Joey Gibson, who recently ran in for Congress in Southwest Washington. Patriot Prayer has been accused of courting white supremacists and provoking violence at their rallies.

The extremist street fighting group known as the Proud Boys has also made national headlines in October after their members brutally attacked counter protesters, leading to multiple arrests, Newsweek reported. The attacks came after Proud Boy founder Gavin McInnes gave a two-hour speech paying tribute to the assassination of a Japanese Socialist Party leader. The New York Police Department has arrest five of the nine Proud Boys they are looking for, and have already charged several with felonies.

In a failed act of domestic terrorism throughout last week, the New York Times reported that federal law enforcement arrested Cesar Sayoc Jr. on suspicion of mailing about dozen bombs to prominent Democratic politicians, media outlets and left-leaning political donors. Sayoc is a registered Republican, and many of his targets were people commonly targeted in political rhetoric from within President Donald Trump’s administration and right-wing conspiracy theorists.

The Pacific Northwest has a long relationship with neo-Nazis and white supremacists despite its liberal image. Several hate groups call Western Washington home, including a chapter of ACT for America and Faith and Freedom, which are anti-Muslim groups. The Southern Poverty Law Center Hate Watch map lists the neo-Nazi organizations Crew 38, Blood and Honour, Wolves of Vinland, American Front, the Hammerskins and the Northwest Front as active in the state — all of which hope to create a white entho-state through ethnic cleansing and genocide.
The mayor is condemning free speech? Well, isn't that an interesting thing to hear from an elected official! Why, it's almost as if I can see the marionette strings attached to her mouth with Abe Foxman and Morris Dees up above yanking them deftly, with the same strings attached to presstitute Aaron Kunkler's lips too! Then again, with a name like Kunkler, perhaps he hails from the same tribe as Foxman and Dees.....
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