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Somebody has been in the news

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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from William & Mary has been in the news

PostSat Mar 02, 2019 12:16 am

http://flathatnews.com/2019/02/26/polic ... on-campus/

Antisemitic and anti-LGBTQIA+ posters found in academic buildings on campus, subsequently removed
By Gavin Aquin - February 26, 2019

Friday Feb. 22, letters were posted in academic buildings on the Sunken Garden and the Sadler Center at the College of William and Mary expressing homophobic, anti-Semitic and white-nationalist language. The identity of the individual who created the letters has not been revealed.

An illustration of a skull and crossbones was depicted on the letter, entitled a “Generation of Revenge.” The letter started by asking God to forgive men for their hedonist and sinful nature while simultaneously asking for revenge against Jewish and LGBTQIA+ communities.

Mary Grier ’22 first noticed the poster in Tyler Hall while waiting for her first class of the day to start.

“It took me a couple of seconds to figure out what it was because honestly it looked a lot like any other normal flyer,” Grier said in a written statement. “…(sic) Just a bunch of text and an illustration.” Upon reading the text and the illustration it became clear to Grier that the message was not a normal academic letter.

“I didn’t quite understand what the references were at first, but the rest of the language was so aggressive that it spooked me regardless,” Grier said. “I picked up on the homophobic bits pretty fast because I’ve heard [“Sodomites”] before, and the rest of it read very similar to other white supremacist beliefs and doctrine I’ve heard about in the news [or] on tv, so it wasn’t very far to jump to get to that conclusion.”

Grier ripped the poster down in response and took it to the William and Mary Police Department.

According to College Spokesperson Suzanne Clavet, WMPD responded to reports that the letter was posted in three places on campus: Earl Gregg Swem Library, Sadler Center and Tucker Hall. Clavet said that WMPD officers removed the letters as they violated campus policy. Personnel from Student Affairs assisted in their decision to take down the flyers.

“Campus policy requires that any poster or flyer carry the name of the sponsoring organization and the date (week) of posting,” Clavet said in a written statement. “At this point, we don’t know who is responsible for the flyers or the specific intent of the message on them. WMPD is aware of the flyers and at this time has found no criminal activity.”

In an official response to the poster, Vice President for Student Affairs Ginger Ambler affirmed the administration’s commitment to responding to student complaints regarding the posters.

“Late last week, members of the student affairs staff and the W&M Police Department (WMPD) responded to reports from several members of our community about concerning flyers posted on campus,” Ambler said in a written statement. “We take such reports from members of our community seriously. I am grateful to the WMPD who reached out immediately to staff in the affected buildings and met with them on site. The flyers in question violated the university’s posting policies and they were promptly removed. We are committed to responding right away to reports – formal or informal – regarding the safety of the W&M community.”

Rabbi Gershon Litt, director of the College’s Hillel program, denounced the letters as both hateful propaganda and a heinously incorrect usage of religion in an attempt to spread fear throughout the College community.

“Hate, judgment, and revenge are not characteristics of good, spiritual people,” Litt said in a written statement. “Likewise, organizations that cloak themselves as ‘religious’ or ‘for the good of society’ only want to bring others down due to their own lack of purpose. Lovers and pursuers of peace are people who accept others and empower others, but the authors of this hate speech pursue division and hatred.”

Litt went on to say that the letter does not accurately reflect the viewpoints of spiritual people.

“THESE WORDS OF HATE AND INTOLERANCE HAVE NO PLACE ON OUR CAMPUS. WE, AS A COMMUNITY, SHOULD FIGHT THIS PROPAGANDA WITH WEAPONS OF ACCEPTANCE, LOVE, AND UNITY.”

“The authors of this do not represent the American dream, they are not people of spirituality, and dare they even mention G-d in the same breath of their spewed repulsive words, they certainly are not ‘G-dly’ people,” Litt said. “These words of hate and intolerance have no place on our campus. We, as a community, should fight this propaganda with weapons of acceptance, love, and unity. Hillel strongly condemns this hate speech and everything it represents. May our community come together under the umbrella of unity against hate.”

Jewish students became alarmed after reading the letters. Naomi Gale ’22 expressed fear about knowing that there was an individual or individuals on campus with such violent views.

“I WAS QUITE SCARED KNOWING THAT THERE COULD BE SOMEONE HERE THAT WANTS ME DEAD BECAUSE OF MY RELIGION.”

“I was quite scared knowing that there could be someone here that wants me dead because of my religion,” Gale said in a written statement. “Of course, I’m aware of growing anti-Semitism on college campuses but it still really shocked me to hear about this happening at William and Mary. While I still feel safer here than a lot of my Jewish friends at other college campuses, the posters were a reality check at the same time.”

Anna Platt ’22 noticed the letters while attending class in Tucker Hall.

“I saw a police officer in Tucker looking for the posters, and a professor spoke to me and said he wouldn’t leave campus that night until they were all down and WMPD had started a full-on investigation,” Platt said.

Many members of the College’s political organizations came out together in support of the marginalized communities targeted by the unknown perpetrator.

“We at the College Republicans of the College of William & Mary would like to denounce the hateful message which has been promulgated by this poster,” College Republicans President Tom Callahan ’21 said in a written statement. “We firmly condemn hatred of any group regardless of class, sexual orientation, religion, race, political ideology or gender. We hope that the William & Mary community will come together in denouncing this vile rhetoric and promote a community of healthy respect.”

The Young Democratic Socialists also condemned the letter and referred to it as fascist. They also called for the WMPD to respond to the threats.

“The Young Democratic Socialists of America at William & Mary are deeply alarmed by the fascist posters which have been distributed throughout campus, calling for violence against Jewish and LGBTQ+ people,” Faisal Alami ’20 said in a written statement. “The administration and the WMPD must respond to these threats against marginalized groups by taking swift action. Their ongoing silence is troubling; far-right extremists are far and away the biggest threat to public safety in the United States. If the administration and the WMPD do not respond immediately, they may be endangering the lives of our marginalized students. The YDSA will continue to stand in defense and solidarity with marginalized groups against the threats of the far-right. We will not be intimidated by the fascists who produced and distributed those hateful flyers.”

WMPD and the administration are currently investigating the identity of the individual or individuals who posted the letter.
If no criminal activity was found, why do the cops need to ascertain the identity of anyone? To harass, perhaps?? :shock:

This attitude towards free speech is very popular among cops and their political (read Jewish) masters these days!
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Polish Town NY has been in the news

PostSat Mar 02, 2019 12:32 am

https://riverheadnewsreview.timesreview ... lish-town/

Flyer promoting white nationalist group posted in Polish Town
by Tara Smith | 02/18/2019 3:00 PM

A flyer promoting a white nationalist group was discovered in Polish Town Monday morning.

The poster read “Better dead than red,” and was found plastered to an electrical box at the intersection of Pulaski Street and Hamilton Avenue. It directed people to the Patriot Front website.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors hate groups and other extremists throughout the U.S., Patriot Front is a white nationalist group and an offshoot of Vanguard America, which led the violent rally in Charlottesville in 2017.

The Patriot Front manifesto claims democracy has “failed” America and calls for the formation of a white “ethnostate,” excluding people of color. “Our national way of life faces complete annihilation as our culture and heritage are attacked from all sides,” it reads.

The SPLC noted that Patriot Front activism consists of anonymously posted flyers or dropping banners off buildings or overpasses.

It was unclear if any additional posters were found in the area or when exactly the flyer in Polish Town was posted.

Connie Lassandro, who chairs the Riverhead Anti-Bias Task Force, said she was troubled by the poster.

“White supremacy, bias, prejudice, racism toward any individual, or groups of individuals of any kind is unacceptable, unwarranted and will not be tolerated in our community,” she said Monday afternoon. “We denounce groups such as Patriot Front and Vanguard America. We stand by the Mission of the Anti-Bias Task Force. All persons are entitled to feel safe and respected.”

Riverhead police said an officer removed the poster in Polish Town Monday afternoon. No other posters were found in the area. Police had not received any calls on it besides an inquiry from the News-Review, police said.

Ms. Lassandro said the Anti-Bias Task Force is planning to address this incident at its monthly meeting Tuesday, Feb. 19 at 5:30 p.m. at the Senior Center on Shade Tree Lane in Aquebogue.

Photo caption: The flyer pictured Monday morning in Polish Town. (Credit: Joe Werkmeister)

tsmith@timesreview.com
Almost missed finding this story. Somebody on Long Island has been busy!
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Duluth has been in the news

PostSat Mar 02, 2019 11:14 pm

https://www.thebarkumd.com/news/2019/2/ ... -in-duluth

IDENTITY EVROPA STICKERS AND SYMBOLS FOUND IN DULUTH

A Facebook post published on Feb. 4th caused concern when it revealed that an Identity Evropa sticker had been placed on the back of a bus stop at 14th Ave. and East Superior St.

Identity Evropa have become well-known as part of the growing alt-right movement in the United States and have been labeled as proponents of fascism and nazism by many of their critics.

The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), a nonprofit advocacy organization specializing in civil rights, described Identity Evropa as, “created by Nathan Damigo, a former Marine enrolled at the California State University, Stanislaus. A close associate of outspoken white nationalist, Richard Spencer, Damigo’s focus has remained largely on packaging his racist message as intellectualized identity politics.”

The post, made by Nik Nerburn, showed the sticker before and after it was damaged to remove the organization’s name. Nerburn, who made clear in his post that the sticker and organization’s presence was upsetting, said that, “Some people might not be alarmed by something small like a sticker, but I am. In our current political climate, white supremacists are feeling emboldened to commit real acts of violence. Either acting alone or in groups, these people pose an immediate threat to our community.”

With most activity based on or near college campuses, the SPLC went on to say that, “as college campuses across the nation settle into the fall semester, many are being confronted by the realities of white supremacy.”

NBC, while reporting on recent actions by the organization’s founder, described Identity Evropa’s origins as interconnected with the political rallies held in 2017 in Charlottesville, which saw both sides of the political spectrum clash, sometimes violently. “Identity Evropa gained notoriety last year when it helped organize the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.”

The organization does not shy away from its association with the western world and describes itself as such, “Identity Evropa is an American Identitarian organization. As such, our main objective is to create a better world for people of European heritage – particularly in America – by peacefully effecting cultural change. Identity Evropa is thus an explicitly non-violent organization.” It should be noted that Identity Evropa does not identify itself a neo-nazi organization.

With the conversation of what can and can’t be posted becoming a common one on and off campus, the presence and removal of Identity Evropa’s stickers in Duluth only builds on to the developing situation.
As usual with these tightly controlled media outlets, there's no comments section, no attempt was made to find someone who may have been supportive of Identity Evropa was contacted, and no effort was made to reach out to the subject of the stickers (Identity Evropa itself) to get their side of the story. Apparently Journalism 101 these days involves teaching amateur presstitutes to present only one side of the story.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from New Albany IN has been in the news

PostSat Mar 02, 2019 11:21 pm

https://www.whas11.com/article/news/loc ... 87dfc6af0b

Nazi, hate speech stickers found in New Albany
Mayor Jeff Gahan said there have been two reported incidents, and asked state lawmakers to pass a hate crime bill for Indiana.
Author: WHAS11 Staff, Tyler Emery
Published: 12:41 PM EST February 20, 2019
Updated: 7:32 PM EST February 20, 2019

NEW ALBANY, Ind. — New Albany Mayor Jeff Gahan responded to reports that hundreds of Nazi and other hate speech stickers have been distributed throughout the community.

According to Gahan, there have been two reported incidents where about eight stickers using Nazi or other hateful words were posted, and the Human Rights Commission met last night to discuss the issue.

“We take these reports seriously,” Gahan said. “I have directed the New Albany Police Department to immediately follow up on the incidents brought forth at the Commission meeting and investigate them thoroughly.”

Gahan said hate speech is not welcomed in New Albany, and that he is proud the Human Rights Commissions brought the issues to the surface during their forum.

“Hate speech and hate groups are not welcome in the city of New Albany,” continued Mayor Gahan. “New Albany is a safe and welcoming community and hate messaging is not reflective of our values of inclusion, tolerance, and respect.”

At the forum last night, residents and police chief Todd Bailey spoke up about the issue. Human Right Commission Vice President Jennifer Ortiz said one person says he even saw a sticker back in June.

Todd Bailey wouldn't comment any further on the incidents because the investigation is still ongoing. Ortiz said the stickers make her feel "fearful" and "ashamed."

"What goes through my mind is just feeling uncomfortable, personally, feeling afraid and I think that's a natural feeling, you don't really know what these people's intentions are," Ortiz said. "So to see Nazi stickers in a town that has a human rights commission just seems to fly in the face of what we stand for as a community."

In his statement, Gahan also addressed state lawmakers, asking them to pass a hate crime bill similar to bills passed in 45 other states.

“I would encourage the state legislators of Indiana to pass a hate crime bill similar to those passed in 45 other states in this country, which to date our state has chosen not to recognize," Gahan said.

New Albany residents are asked to take the following steps if they see similar stickers:

Do not remove the stickers as the Chief stated they need to preserve evidence. These stickers are considered vandalism.
Contact NAPD at 812-944-6411 (not 911) and report the incident and location to law enforcement. The police will document the incident and remove the stickers.
If you are unable or unwilling to contact police, please take photos and email them to the New Albany Human Rights Commission at humanrights@cityofnewalbany.com. Please note the date of the incident and the location.
You may also email Chief Bailey directly at tbailey@napdin.net
Note the remains of another sticker on a lamppost (in the video) not related to the stickers featured in this story weren't mentioned as being under any sort of investigation by police.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Phoenix has been in the news

PostMon Mar 04, 2019 2:04 am

http://www.statepress.com/article/2019/ ... acist-bait

Opinion: Don't take white supremacist bait
Fighting alt-right propaganda requires a strategic approach

By Daniel Rubio | 03/01/19 9:08pm
In early February, images of posters placed around the ASU campus began to be shared online. The posters featured Nick Sandmann, one of the Covington Catholic High School students who was embroiled in controversy following viral footage of a standoff between the students and Omaha tribe elder Nathan Phillips.

For many students, the subtext of the posters was clearly racist and followed a number of egregious posters, some that have been associated with the Identity Evropa movement, an organization that the SPLC recognizes as a hate group.

There’s no doubt that these posters are the result of emboldened racism in the U.S. But currently, there’s no evidence of a mass movement of white supremacists on campus. The reaction to the posters has played right into the hands of those who put up the hateful signs.

Students should be mindful of not falling for white nationalist bait by amplifying their message. ASU should work to make sure similar posters are removed more swiftly to avoid creating the spectacle that has ensued and made campus feel more hostile for many students.

The most recent spate of posters on campus resulted in multiple social media postings that were widely shared. An ensuing State Press article about the kerfuffle, like the social media posts, featured an image of the poster prominently.

The reaction is understandable given the history of similar posters on campus. Students are rightfully sick of posters that espouse the same tired white nationalist screeds.

Sarah Parks, a graduate student at ASU and a member of the Multicultural Solidarity Coalition, said that these posters have appeared on campus over the last three semesters.

“So we have heard that argument before and one thing is that these posters would be up regardless of whether we put it up on social media or not”, Parks said. “They do keep coming up. And so one aspect of making it more known is to let other students know that ‘Hey, you’re not necessarily alone’, because when there’s silence around it, it just feeds more into the culture of white supremacy.”

But the fact of the matter is that whoever put up the posters, referred to by ASU president Michael Crow as “Cro-Magnons,” could be just a single individual with a printer and an hour of time.

But why would they stop putting up the posters?

Alt-right politics is driven by a troll-culture, inciting reactions and hiding behind irony to spread their ideology. The mass hysteria generated every time they put one up plays right into their hands.

This has become an extremely efficient way for them to spread their message and gain attention. For just the cost of printing out some posters and putting them up around campus, they get their message seen countless times on social media.

The most recent State Press article spawned an article in Breitbart and The College Fix, two outlets with audiences more than primed for the message articulated by these posters.

The way to stem the flow of these posters is to stop making it an effective strategy.

ASU should become more proactive about taking these posters down and provide a more effective way for students to report the posters when they pop-up. Students should be more careful about how they discuss the posters on social media and should avoid sharing images of them.

Most essentially, ASU needs a secure way for students to easily report such posters without having to stir up attention on social media to get the University's attention.

On this point, Parks agreed and suggested, “A hotline, a place, where all students know this is where we can go to report it. And also, staff or people designated to when this does pop up that they're the ones to take it down because that’s a huge toll on students — especially students of color."

Reach the columnist at djrubio2@asu.edu and follow @DanielRubioAZ on Twitter.
Someone has got inside Rubio's head, Rubio wants ASU to prohibit free speech he doesn't like more efficiently! Note the name-calling. Stamp your feet and pout when Whites put up pro-White posters too, if it makes you feel better.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody in Salt Lake City has been in the news

PostWed Mar 06, 2019 10:54 pm

Those guys in Utah don't quit!

https://www.kunc.org/post/white-nationa ... t#stream/0

White Nationalist Groups Rising On College Campuses In Mountain West
By NATE HEGYI • MAR 5, 2019

When University of Utah senior Mohan Sudabattula found the posters hanging recently from the side of the art building on campus, the first-generation son of immigrants from southeastern India was surprised but not shocked. He’d seen similar posters – the red, white and blue lettering – popping up all over campus.

Sudabattula snapped a couple of pictures and sent them to friends. Then he tore the posters down and stuffed them in his pant pockets.

When he got home he hid them in a dorm bathroom cabinet for a week, until he agreed to show them to a reporter.

“These are them,” he said. “There’s three of them.”

The posters were from a white nationalist group called Patriot Front. Sudabattula shuffled them in his hands. One had a map of the United States on it with the words “Not Stolen, Conquered.”

The slogan suggests a simplistic reference to America’s complicated history of breaking treaties and taking land from indigenous people. The others are more vague.

“The posters are pretty clever with their wording,” Sudabattula said. “They don’t really come off as harmful right out of the gate. But then you go online and the manifesto is a direct call to action against people of color.”

Founded two years ago in the aftermath of the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Patriot Front has been labeled a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, one of a handful of organizations nationwide that tracks such organizations. According to a new report from the center, hate groups like Patriot Group are on the rise both across the country and in the Mountain West.

In recent months, campuses in Montana , Wyoming , Utah and Colorado have seen a rash of pamphleting, protesting and recruiting efforts by Patriot Front and another white nationalist group, Identity Evropa. Universities have condemned their actions.

“These cowardly, faceless and non-university sanctioned tactics are designed to disrupt and frighten individuals and communities, and to garner attention for an insidious ideology that has no place on our campus or in our community,” University of Utah president Ruth V. Watkins said in a statement released in January.

But that attention also seems to spur these groups.

“I’m loving the tears over our latest activism in Utah, but it’s odd because most actions – even those that receive mainstream media coverage – rarely generate this much outrage,” Patrick Casey, executive director of Identity Evropa, wrote in a tweet. “I suppose that means we’ll have to ramp things up in Utah!”

Richard Medina, a geography professor at the University of Utah, believes Identity Evropa and Patriot Front are coming to the Mountain West because, while the region is predominantly white, it has a growing latino and immigrant population.

“They’re focused on the Rocky Mountain region because there’s a lot of change going on,” Medina, a co-author of a recent study on the geography of hate groups, said. “Like a lot of these groups, their main motivation is, in some ways, a resistance to change.”

Questionable tactics

Patriot Front and Identity Evropa have their roots in a far right, white nationalist movement that originated in France and has since spread throughout Europe and into the United States. The movement frames changing demographics from immigration as white genocide.

“These people see themselves as victims and that the whole European, white culture and ethnicity is going to go away,” he said.

Medina isn’t sure whether the recruiting tactics at the region’s college campuses will work, though.

“I think they’ve come here because they see some opportunity,” he said. “Whether or not they believe they can recruit some members or whether they can get a message to people that they believe are like-minded, I’m not sure.”

For Sudabattula, these hate groups might be new to the region but the racism feels familiar. When he was young, his family lived in Kentucky for a time in the immediate years after 9/11.

“Things started to get a little stressful at school. My dad was experiencing some workplace hostility,” he said.

To leave that environment, the family moved to a Salt Lake City suburb, in a state that prides itself on being friendly to immigrants and refugees. But even there, he said, some white people he met were tone deaf.

“‘You’re like the coolest Indian I know,’ implying that everyone else is odd or unusual,” Sudabattula recalled what some would tell him. “Or, ‘Oh, I love your people, your country. I served a mission out there.’”

He says it was subtle and sometimes unintentional – like a little ember of racism in a fire pit. Now Sudabattula believes white nationalists are coming to the Mountain West to blow on that ember.

“You have a bunch of people who are now trying to approach passive white folks and they’re basically saying, ‘Look: We all agree on the same thing. We think that minorities are different. But we don’t have to cater to their needs anymore. This is our home and they are coming here,’” he said.

Sudabattula said the rise in hate here is scary and it’s up to white people in the region to step up and take action.

“At the end of the day, the hate groups look like my friends,” he said. “And my friends, I think, are in a different position to say something.”

This story was produced by the Mountain West News Bureau, a collaboration between Wyoming Public Media, Boise State Public Radio in Idaho, KUER in Salt Lake City and KRCC and KUNC in Colorado.
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Brighton has been in the news

PostWed Mar 06, 2019 11:05 pm

https://www.wxxinews.org/post/ur-studen ... acy-fliers

UR student accused of violating Brighton Town Code in connection with white supremacy fliers
By RANDY GORBMAN • MAR 4, 2019

Brighton Police have identified a University of Rochester student as the suspect behind several flyers that promoted a white supremacist organization.

This dates back to an incident last fall, when a number of flyers and stickers were found on public property in Brighton. The flyers and stickers contained a logo with the name, Identity Evropa, the name of a white supremacist organization.

Brighton Police Chief Mark Henderson says they were able to pull fingerprints from adhesive tape on three of the fliers, and identify 23 year old Christopher Hodgman of Bethesda, Maryland as a suspect.

He is a U of R student who currently lives in Rochester. Henderson says that after consulting with state and federal authorities, it was determined that the placing of the flyers does not constitute a criminal act, but they are a violation of the Brighton Town Code.

Hodgman was charged with three counts of violating the town code, and he could face a fine and perhaps some jail time if convicted.

The U of R released this statement:

"We were informed by Brighton town officials of the arrest of a current University of Rochester undergraduate student for violation of town ordinances in connection with the posting of unauthorized flyers. The flyers are associated with Identity Evropa, a white nationalist organization identified by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a hate group.

The University has made clear its commitment to diversity, inclusion, and respect. We unequivocally condemn acts of hatred or intimidation. University community members are strongly encouraged to report any incidents motivated by discrimination of a person or target group. Full information is found at https://www.rochester.edu/care/reports.html We ask each member of our University community to work to ensure that our institution is one where everyone feels welcomed and valued."
Comments section appears at the end of this article too. Will you make your voice heard?
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody from Brighton has been in the news

PostThu Mar 07, 2019 11:18 pm

Jim Mathias wrote:https://www.wxxinews.org/post/ur-student-accused-violating-brighton-town-code-connection-white-supremacy-fliers

UR student accused of violating Brighton Town Code in connection with white supremacy fliers


Follow-up: https://www.democratandchronicle.com/st ... 065765002/

Lawyer for UR student: Citations for Identity Evropa flyers 'selective enforcement' of town code
Georgie Silvarole, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle Published 7:03 p.m. ET March 5, 2019 | Updated 5:56 p.m. ET March 6, 2019

By using a town code violation to penalize an individual for posting flyers on behalf of a pro-white, anti-immigration group, a Rochester attorney said, the Brighton Police Department violated his client's First Amendment right to free speech.

"The problem is there's selective enforcement here of the town ordinance based upon a constitutionally protected exercise of speech," said Donald Thompson, an attorney who specializes in cases involving civil rights violations. "This is not anywhere close to the line. It is really equivalent to a lost dog poster."

Brighton police cited 23-year-old Christopher Hodgman, a senior at the University of Rochester, with three separate violations of the town code for posting the flyers to public utilities and property last fall. The violations each carry a $250 fine and up to 15 days in jail.

Thompson, Hodgman's attorney, said if the ordinance prohibiting the posting of flyers to public spaces was uniformly and constantly enforced, there would be no issue. But in this situation, he said, that is not the case.


"Why, in this particular instance, is that violation being enforced?" Thompson said. "Well, it’s because of the content of the speech, as they perceive it, and that’s the problem. It's an attempt to chill speech based up on constitutionally protected content."

Police were able to pull fingerprints from adhesive tape used on three separate flyers to identify Hodgman — an endeavor that Thompson said seems largely out of proportion to the mildness of the violation itself.

"(This is) an investigation heretofore never seen for a town ordinance violation," Thompson said. "I've had murder cases that were not investigated as thoroughly."

Thompson said that the flyers, which featured the name and logo of a white nationalist organization called Identity Evropa, were no more unconstitutional in nature than a lost dog poster or a flyer advertising an apartment for rent.

"If you research the group that’s represented on the posters, you might agree with their stand, you might disagree with their stand, but it's not inflammatory," Thompson said. "They just really like white people. ... Some people translate that, probably appropriately, as white supremacist-type messaging. But you’re like two steps away from speech that would fall outside of the First Amendment where you're calling for some type of violence or some kind of targeting of a particular group."

Though its messaging and marketing tactics give it the illusion of being largely harmless, Identity Evropa is one of two pre-eminent white supremacist groups in the country, said Keegan Hankes, a senior research analyst for the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project.

That group, along with another called Patriot Front, has mastered using social media and online chat forums to create virtual communities, Hankes said. In recent years, white supremacist groups have focused on rebranding their image — the term "alt-right," he said, is a modern example of that — and recruiting on college campuses to combat their aging membership.

Using terms like "identitarian" and "pro-white" allows groups such as Identity Evropa to appear polished and benign, but Hankes said the age-old objective of promoting white separatist ideologies and belief of the inherent inferiority of nonwhite people is the same.

"If you can obfuscate the inherent racism, you can make it more palatable to a wider audience," Hankes said. "Patrick Casey, (Identity Evropa's current leader), has worked very, very hard to rebrand them as an Identitarian movement: 'Whites should be able to organize around white identity politics, and that this has nothing to do with racism.'"

Posting flyers or stickers is a common first step outside the digital communication had within white supremacist circles, Hankes said. It's relatively low-risk, but when news organizations cover the appearance of white nationalist propaganda, it creates a positive feedback loop for the poster — and a sense of purpose.

Because groups like Identity Evropa exist largely on the internet, it's impossible to estimate membership totals, Hankes said. But just because these groups have shied away from frequent public activism doesn't mean that they're not present in many communities — Brighton included.

"It's not that these people didn’t exist, it's just that they were invisible," Hankes said. "The truth of the matter is that white nationalism is a very violent ideology. ... This is the ideal that they're striving for, and there's no path to that without some version of ethnic cleansing."

On Tuesday, Jose Fernandez, the president of the University of Rochester College Republicans chapter, released a scathing statement condemning Hodgman's alleged actions.

"It would be irresponsible for our chapter to do anything but assert in the most certain, forceful possible terms that we fully repudiate Mr. Hodgman’s actions and beliefs," Fernandez said in the statement. "Just as important, however, on behalf of our chapter, I deeply apologize for the harm done by our previous president."

Hodgman briefly served as the chapter's president during the 2017 fall semester, according to a separate Facebook post, but had "entirely abdicated his duties" by the middle of the semester.

In the statement, Fernandez said he felt disgusted to learn of Hodgman's alleged actions and felt compelled to make clear that his actions do not represent the beliefs or morals of their College Republicans chapter.

"Rather than implicating us, he obligates us to openly and forcefully reject the ideals he cowardly promotes," Fernandez said in the statement. "We hope the Republican Party chooses to purge itself of the Christopher Hodgmans of the world, just as our chapter has."

GSILVAROLE@Gannett.com
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Somebody has been in the news

PostThu Mar 07, 2019 11:21 pm

https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing ... percent-in

White supremacist propaganda incidents jumped 182 percent in 2018: study
BY MORGAN GSTALTER - 03/06/19 10:07 AM EST

White supremacists increased their propaganda distribution by 182 percent in 2018, canvassing neighborhoods and campuses across the country, according to a new study released Tuesday by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).

The data was collected through ADL’s H.E.A.T. Map, which tracked the distribution of racist, anti-Semitic and Islamophobic fliers, stickers, banners and posters.

The group counted 1,187 distributions across the U.S. in 2018, up from 421 total incidents reported in 2017.

“Posting fliers is a tried-and-true tactic for hate groups, one that enables them to spread hateful ideas and sow fear across an entire community,” Jonathan Greenblatt, ADL's CEO and national director, said in a statement.

“Hate groups were emboldened in 2018, but their increasing reliance on hate leafleting indicates that most of their members understand this is a fringe activity and are unwilling to risk greater public exposure or arrest.”

There was 319 recorded incidents of white supremacist propaganda appearing on 212 college and university campuses in 37 states and in Washington, D.C. The ADL notes that there were 292 incidents recorded in 2017.

Alt-right groups such as Patriot Front, Identity Evropa and the Daily Stormer were responsible from a majority of non-campus community propaganda efforts.

The Ku Klux Klan also increased their efforts in 2018, according to the 97 recorded incidents of klan fliers being left on doorsteps or driveways. That is a 20 percent increase from the previous four-year average of 77, the ADL found.

In addition to propaganda efforts, the number of rallies and demonstrations by white supremacist groups jumped last year.

There were at least 91 white supremacist rallies or other events attended by white supremacists last year, up from 76 the previous year.

The highest levels of activity for white supremacist propaganda was concentrated in the states of California, Texas, Colorado, New York, Illinois, Florida and Virginia, according to the ADL.
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Will Williams

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Re: Somebody from Brighton has been in the news

PostFri Mar 08, 2019 4:13 pm

Jim Mathias wrote:
Jim Mathias wrote:https://www.wxxinews.org/post/ur-student-accused-violating-brighton-town-code-connection-white-supremacy-fliers

UR student accused of violating Brighton Town Code in connection with white supremacy fliers


Follow-up: https://www.democratandchronicle.com/st ... 065765002/

Lawyer for UR student: Citations for Identity Evropa flyers 'selective enforcement' of town code
Georgie Silvarole, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle Published 7:03 p.m. ET March 5, 2019 | Updated 5:56 p.m. ET March 6, 2019

By using a town code violation to penalize an individual for posting flyers on behalf of a pro-white, anti-immigration group, a Rochester attorney said, the Brighton Police Department violated his client's First Amendment right to free speech.

"The problem is there's selective enforcement here of the town ordinance based upon a constitutionally protected exercise of speech," said Donald Thompson, an attorney who specializes in cases involving civil rights violations. "This is not anywhere close to the line. It is really equivalent to a lost dog poster."

Brighton police cited 23-year-old Christopher Hodgman, a senior at the University of Rochester, with three separate violations of the town code for posting the flyers to public utilities and property last fall. The violations each carry a $250 fine and up to 15 days in jail.

Thompson, Hodgman's attorney, said if the ordinance prohibiting the posting of flyers to public spaces was uniformly and constantly enforced, there would be no issue. But in this situation, he said, that is not the case.

"Why, in this particular instance, is that violation being enforced?" Thompson said. "Well, it’s because of the content of the speech, as they perceive it, and that’s the problem. It's an attempt to chill speech based up on constitutionally protected content."

Police were able to pull fingerprints from adhesive tape used on three separate flyers to identify Hodgman — an endeavor that Thompson said seems largely out of proportion to the mildness of the violation itself.

"(This is) an investigation heretofore never seen for a town ordinance violation," Thompson said. "I've had murder cases that were not investigated as thoroughly."

Thompson said that the flyers, which featured the name and logo of a white nationalist organization called Identity Evropa, were no more unconstitutional in nature than a lost dog poster or a flyer advertising an apartment for rent.

"If you research the group that’s represented on the posters, you might agree with their stand, you might disagree with their stand, but it's not inflammatory," Thompson said. "They just really like white people. ... Some people translate that, probably appropriately, as white supremacist-type messaging. But you’re like two steps away from speech that would fall outside of the First Amendment where you're calling for some type of violence or some kind of targeting of a particular group."

Though its messaging and marketing tactics give it the illusion of being largely harmless, Identity Evropa is one of two pre-eminent white supremacist groups in the country, said Keegan Hankes, a senior research analyst for the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project.

That group, along with another called Patriot Front, has mastered using social media and online chat forums to create virtual communities, Hankes said. In recent years, white supremacist groups have focused on rebranding their image — the term "alt-right," he said, is a modern example of that — and recruiting on college campuses to combat their aging membership.

Using terms like "identitarian" and "pro-white" allows groups such as Identity Evropa to appear polished and benign, but Hankes said the age-old objective of promoting white separatist ideologies and belief of the inherent inferiority of nonwhite people is the same.

"If you can obfuscate the inherent racism, you can make it more palatable to a wider audience," Hankes said. "Patrick Casey, (Identity Evropa's current leader), has worked very, very hard to rebrand them as an Identitarian movement: 'Whites should be able to organize around white identity politics, and that this has nothing to do with racism.'"

Posting flyers or stickers is a common first step outside the digital communication had within white supremacist circles, Hankes said. It's relatively low-risk, but when news organizations cover the appearance of white nationalist propaganda, it creates a positive feedback loop for the poster — and a sense of purpose.

Because groups like Identity Evropa exist largely on the internet, it's impossible to estimate membership totals, Hankes said. But just because these groups have shied away from frequent public activism doesn't mean that they're not present in many communities — Brighton included.

"It's not that these people didn’t exist, it's just that they were invisible," Hankes said. "The truth of the matter is that white nationalism is a very violent ideology. :lol: ... This is the ideal that they're striving for, and there's no path to that without some version of ethnic cleansing."

On Tuesday, Jose Fernandez, the president of the University of Rochester College Republicans chapter, released a scathing statement condemning Hodgman's alleged actions.

"It would be irresponsible for our chapter to do anything but assert in the most certain, forceful possible terms that we fully repudiate Mr. Hodgman’s actions and beliefs," Fernandez said in the statement. "Just as important, however, on behalf of our chapter, I deeply apologize for the harm done by our previous president."

Hodgman briefly served as the chapter's president during the 2017 fall semester, according to a separate Facebook post, but had "entirely abdicated his duties" by the middle of the semester.

In the statement, Fernandez said he felt disgusted to learn of Hodgman's alleged actions and felt compelled to make clear that his actions do not represent the beliefs or morals of their College Republicans chapter.

"Rather than implicating us, he obligates us to openly and forcefully reject the ideals he cowardly promotes," Fernandez said in the statement. "We hope the Republican Party chooses to purge itself of the Christopher Hodgmans of the world, just as our chapter has."

GSILVAROLE@Gannett.com

Thompson has it right, but I object to his use of the term "White supremacist."

Should we have an activist in the Brighton, NY, area harassed by their authoritarian cops, Thompson is the man to contact.

Image

Keegan Hankes is a new watchdog in the SPLC stable.

Image
Goofball Pussyboy Hankes

The National Alliance is not alt-right, not White supremacist, not Identitarian, whatever that is. We are White racial nationalists, racial separatists! We advocate geographical separation of our race from the other races that claim we are the cause of all of their problems. We have no desire to be supreme over them, or to exploit them as with segregation or apartheid of old.

I've been hearing about the "anti-Semitic tropes" in the news as the Jews just got passed a resolution in the Congress opposing "hatred." What in hell is a trope? I guess that's like a meme, or a dog whistle, or hate messaging or some of those silly new words/terms that are being thrown around like Identitarian or cuckservative. Dr. Pierce predicted that this type of move and the Jew's "model statutes" would be the precursor to legislation making pro-White speech and organizations illegal, subject to fines and jail, like they're trying to do to poor Christopher Hodgemen, Imagine these goddamn cops taking fingerprints off of fliers Chris posted. :lol:

Like my friend Paul L. says, "There is some sick shit out there." The NA is an island of sanity in a world gone stark craving mad!
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