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The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

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Wade Hampton III

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Re: The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

PostFri May 10, 2019 2:49 am

Jews Cannot Print Gold!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ADtwpTbGF0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1bzdNV-TwI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhoGYdLRUTQ
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Nyc21pla posted 3 months ago...


What the FED (Jew) control mainstream media won't say. States Where Gold
and Silver have Become Legal Tender. WYOMING,UTAH,ARIZONA,KANSAS,
OKLAHOMA, TEXAS,INDIANA, MISSOURI,LOUISIANA,SOUTH CAROLINA ......

Wade says, "South Carolina & Tennessee...interesting..."
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

PostSun Jun 02, 2019 6:16 pm

Rom Blackstone, avid gold-bug, wonders if gold is money....

Not exactly.

The current U.S. dollar is backed by two things: First, within the United States,
it is virtually illegal to lend out gold at interest. We are not allowed to place
our gold in a bank and use debit cards to make payments, nor are we allowed to
earn interest on the gold if we just leave it in the bank and don’t spend it.
For this reason, savers who want to earn an income are forced to sell their
gold and store U.S. dollars in the bank instead. This creates demand for dollars
and makes the dollar valuable. This is not only the case with the dollar though.
All fiat national currencies work this way.

Second, the U.S. dollar has value because manufacturers need it to buy oil. Saudi
Arabia and other OPEC nations will only sell oil to companies that have U.S. dollars.
Because of this, companies all over the world need to export products and sell them
to Americans so that they can get the dollars they need to import oil.

In exchange for the OPEC countries’ demanding dollars, the U.S. government protects
the ruling regimes in these countries from being invaded. So ultimately, the dollar
is valuable because the U.S. has the military power to ensure its use. But these
countries could make deals with other countries in the future. For example, they
could ask Russia or China to protect them instead of the U.S. If so, the dollar
could collapse in value rapidly, impoverishing most Americans.

However, this hasn’t happened so far. Most of these countries are currently more
scared of Russia and China than they are of the U.S. So for now, the U.S. dollar
is still valuable. It is true in a sense that the dollar has value because the
government says so…but this is only because the government has tanks, bombs, and
nuclear weapons to make its “say so” matter.
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Colin

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Re: The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

PostSun Jun 02, 2019 6:53 pm

Wade Hampton III wrote:Rom Blackstone, avid gold-bug, wonders if gold is money....

Not exactly.

The current U.S. dollar is backed by two things: First, within the United States,
it is virtually illegal to lend out gold at interest. We are not allowed to place
our gold in a bank and use debit cards to make payments, nor are we allowed to
earn interest on the gold if we just leave it in the bank and don’t spend it.
For this reason, savers who want to earn an income are forced to sell their
gold and store U.S. dollars in the bank instead. This creates demand for dollars
and makes the dollar valuable. This is not only the case with the dollar though.
All fiat national currencies work this way.

Second, the U.S. dollar has value because manufacturers need it to buy oil. Saudi
Arabia and other OPEC nations will only sell oil to companies that have U.S. dollars.
Because of this, companies all over the world need to export products and sell them
to Americans so that they can get the dollars they need to import oil.

In exchange for the OPEC countries’ demanding dollars, the U.S. government protects
the ruling regimes in these countries from being invaded. So ultimately, the dollar
is valuable because the U.S. has the military power to ensure its use. But these
countries could make deals with other countries in the future. For example, they
could ask Russia or China to protect them instead of the U.S. If so, the dollar
could collapse in value rapidly, impoverishing most Americans.

However, this hasn’t happened so far. Most of these countries are currently more
scared of Russia and China than they are of the U.S. So for now, the U.S. dollar
is still valuable. It is true in a sense that the dollar has value because the
government says so…but this is only because the government has tanks, bombs, and
nuclear weapons to make its “say so” matter.


That is an interesting take on US dollar. It is correct on every point. I just wonder how much longer the petrodollar will last.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

PostSun Jun 02, 2019 7:44 pm

Colin wrote:That is an interesting take on US dollar. It is correct on every point. I just wonder how much longer the petrodollar will last.


Russia, China, India, and Iran have already worked their way around the Jews' Federal
System of US Dollar-sanctions, and are actively using barter arrangements, much in the
same manner that Chancellor Hitler used to defeat the International Jews in the '30s. Well,
that did not work out well, but then NS Germany did not have nuclear weapons. Russia,
China, and India do.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

PostThu Jun 06, 2019 4:06 pm

Governments around the world have recently been on a “gold-buying spree.”
These countries have a tactful reason for doing so, and this reason is
directly tied to the anticipation of the inevitable end of US hegemony.
Central banks are among the largest purchasers of gold. So far in 2019,
they have bought 145.5 tons of gold, which is more in a quarter of a
year than central banks have purchased in the preceding six years. To
put it bluntly, this figure represents a 68 percent increase from the
year before. Last year, central banks increased their reserves by 651.5
tonnes compared to 375 tonnes in 2017. Reportedly, this is the largest
net purchase of gold since 1967.

Most interesting, however, is the class of countries that we find are
turning to hoarding more and more gold, many of which are deemed to be
adversaries of Washington. As always, Russia is the largest buyer of
gold. In 2018, Russia’s Central Bank purchased 274.3 tons of gold.
It also dumped 84 percent of its US treasury debts (we will come back
to why this is important later.)

https://www.rt.com/op-ed/461207-central ... ld-dollar/
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

PostFri Jun 07, 2019 3:34 pm

From RT:
Gold prices are going to rise this year, predicts veteran commodities
trader Vince Lanci, founder of Echobay Partners. "The last three days
have reconfirmed my commitment to a much higher gold price in 2018.
We are making higher lows for the year - the recent behavior made me
nervous, but something very telling happened in the last three days,"
Lanci said in a December interview with The Street. If his predictions
are right, gold will hit $1,700 an ounce or higher in 2018, a $400 rally
from the current level of $1,300 an ounce.
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"On Tuesday we had a short covering rally. And Wednesday there was a
10,000-contract increase in December - that's very unusual, that is an
over 2.3 percent increase in open interest," Lanci explained in an
interview initially printed before the Christmas holidays. Gold prices
were down in December, as investors chose more stocks because of US
President Donald Trump's tax plan nearing completion. Many investors
in gold say the price of the precious metal is artificially curbed
because of the paper gold trading on Western exchanges. According to
Claudio Grass, of Precious Metal Advisory Switzerland, the total
trading volume in the London Over-the-Counter (OTC) gold market is
estimated at the equivalent of 1.5 million tons of gold. Only 180,000
tons of gold have actually been mined up to today. "The paper scams
in London and New York will either blow up when the paper price of
gold drops to zero or when just a fraction of investors insists upon
receiving physical gold in return,” Grass told RT. BRICS countries
led by Russia and China are considering launching a gold standard
based on physical gold. “This will present a viable challenger that
could over time lead to a break up of the current system since the
West will likely still trade paper gold in the meantime,” said Grass.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: The Price of Gold: Does It Matter?

PostSun Jun 16, 2019 12:58 am

A Gold Crypto?

From RT:

The Central Bank of Russia (CBR) is studying a proposal to create a gold-backed
cryptocurrency, which could be used for cross-border settlements with other countries.
The bold proposal was made by Russia’s State Duma member Vladimir Gutenev. He has
suggested initiating discussion to set up national cryptocurrency, denominated in gold.
Commenting on Gutenev’s proposal, the head of CBR Elvira Nabiullina said: “As for
mutual settlements, we will consider, of course, a proposal on a cryptocurrency that
is tied to gold. But, in my opinion, it is more important to develop settlements in
national currencies.”
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Gutenev explained that, unlike ordinary cryptocurrencies, which are not secure
because they are not backed by anything, gold-backed cryptos have their value tied
to a real asset. They would come in the form of a so-called stablecoin which is a
type of cryptocurrency but offers price stability characteristics. “[The CBR], in
principle, are opposed to cryptocurrencies being launched into our monetary system.
We do not see the possibility that cryptocurrencies, in fact, fulfill the function
of monetary surrogates,” Nabiullina said. She noted, however, that the regulator
could study the possibility of creating stablecoins while there is a real asset
behind their provision. Nabiullina said last month that Russia’s gold and foreign
exchange reserves will soon top $500 billion. Such a volume of gold bullion and
foreign currency holdings is enough to tackle crisis-like episodes, she explained.
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Boosting gold reserves in order to diversify foreign exchange and reduce reliance
on the (Jew-controlled) US dollar has of late, been part of Russia’s national policy.
The central bank reported in May that gold holdings amounted to nearly $492 billion
against the $487.8 billion recorded at the end of March. The World Gold Council
said last month that Russia had secured the top position among the biggest global
purchasers of the yellow metal in the first quarter of the current year. According
to its report, Russia added 55.3 tons to its vaults, bringing its vast gold reserves
to 2,168.3 tons.
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