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US To Invade Venezuela?

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Wade Hampton III

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US To Invade Venezuela?

PostSun Sep 10, 2017 7:07 pm

In Libya, Muammar Gaddafi was punished for a similar proposal to create a
unified African currency backed by gold, which would be used to buy and
sell African oil. Though it sounds like a ludicrous reason to overthrow
a sovereign government and plunge the country into a humanitarian crisis,
Hillary Clinton’s leaked emails confirmed this was the main reason Gaddafi
was overthrown. The French were especially concerned by Gaddafi’s proposal
and, unsurprisingly, became one of the war’s main contributors. (It was a
French Rafaele jet that struck Gaddafi’s motorcade, ultimately leading to
his death).

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http://peakoil.com/publicpolicy/venezue ... it-matters
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Jim Mathias

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Re: US To Invade Venezuela?

PostTue Sep 12, 2017 1:13 am

Dollar hegemony is the heart of Jewish power in the world. That and the greatly exaggerated and overhyped holohoax, of course.
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White Man 1

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Re: US To Invade Venezuela?

PostWed Sep 13, 2017 7:14 am

Venezuela, from what I've seen, should do a fine enough job knocking themselves over. Aside from their massive inflation and incredible amount of corruption, they have a non-white voter base... and we all know how that works out.

I believe the Jew's next target will be to refocus on Syria. Now that Bashar has retaken his country and a true nationalist government is in place, it won't be long until they don't need us. Then the big kid on the block will demand tribute.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: US To Invade Venezuela?

PostTue Sep 26, 2017 11:07 pm

Jim Rickards posted...

Most readers are familiar with the original petrodollar deal. It was set
up by Henry Kissinger and Saudi princes in 1974 to prop up the U.S. dollar.
At the time, confidence in the dollar was on shaky ground because President
Nixon had ended gold convertibility of dollars in 1971. Saudi Arabia was
receiving dollars for their oil shipments, but they could no longer convert
the dollars to gold at a guaranteed price directly with the U.S. Treasury.
The Saudis were secretly dumping dollars and buying gold on the London market.
This was putting pressure on the bullion banks receiving the dollar. Confidence
in the dollar began to crack. Henry Kissinger and Treasury Secretary William
Simon worked out a plan. If the Saudis would price oil in dollars, U.S. banks
would hold the dollar deposits for the Saudis. These dollars would be “recycled”
to developing economy borrowers, who in turn would buy manufactured goods from
the U.S. and Europe. This would help the global economy and help the U.S.
maintain price stability. The Saudis would get more customers and a stable
dollar, and the U.S. would force the world to accept dollars because everyone
would need the dollars to buy oil. Behind this “deal” was a not so subtle threat
to invade Saudi Arabia and take the oil by force. I personally discussed these
invasion plans in the White House with Kissinger’s deputy, Helmut Sonnenfeldt,
at the time. The petrodollar plan worked brilliantly and the invasion never
happened. Now, 43 years later, the wheels are coming off. The world is losing
confidence in the dollar again. China just announced that any oil-exporter
that accepts yuan for oil can convert the oil to gold on the Shanghai Gold
Exchange and hedge the hard currency value of the gold on the Shanghai Futures
Exchange. This straight-through processing of oil-to-yuan-to-gold eliminates
the role of the dollar. Russia was the first country to agree to accept yuan.
Venezuela has also now signed on to the plan. Russia is #2 and Venezuela is
#7 on the list of the ten largest oil exporters in the world. Others will
follow quickly. The end of the petrodollar and of U.S. dollar hegemony is
upon us.

Leading reserve currencies do die but not necessarily overnight. The process
can persist over many years. For example, the U.S. dollar replaced the UK
pound sterling as the leading reserve currency in the 20th century. That
process was completed at the Bretton Woods conference in 1944, but it began
thirty years earlier in 1914 at the outbreak of World War I. That’s when gold
began to flow from the UK to New York to pay for badly needed war materials
and agricultural exports. The UK also took massive loans from New York bankers
organized by Jack Morgan, head of the Morgan bank at the time. The 1920s and
1930s witnessed a long, slow decline in sterling as it devalued against gold
in 1931, and devalued again against the dollar in 1936. The dollar is losing
its leading reserve currency status now, but there’s no single announcement
or crucial event, just a long, slow process of marginalization. The article
above showed how Venezuela is now pricing oil in yuan instead of dollars.
Russia has now banned dollar payments at its seaports. Although these seaport
facilities are mostly state-owned, many payments, like those for fuel and
tariffs, were still conducted in dollars. Not any more. This is just one of
many stories from around the world showing how the dollar is being pushed out
of international trade and payments to be replaced by yuan, rubles, euros or
gold. Eventually a tipping point will be reached where the dollar collapse
suddenly accelerates as happened to sterling in 1931. Investors should acquire
gold and other hard assets before that happens.

Wade says "Real estate holdings in WV and TN are excellent alternatives!"

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Wade Hampton III

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Re: US To Invade Venezuela?

PostThu Oct 19, 2017 6:05 pm

Lin Xieyi, in Singapore posted...

Will the United States invade Venezuela?

It has begun. Venezuela has passed the point of no return. The Maduro
administration published Oil Prices In Yuan For The first Time, and
this constitute an original sin in the Bible of petrodollars. Recall
back in 2006-2010, when Iran floated the idea of an oil bourse to price
oil in Euros. What transpired was a coordinated financial attack on
the weak link of Eurozone and the PIIGS sovereign default crisis broke
out, beginning with Greece, and spreading to Ireland, Italy, Spain
and Portugal, with the resulting aftermath of plummeting confidence
in the Euro. The US imposed a wide range of sanctions against Iran
under the auspices of UN resolution 1696. The Maduro government will
need to brace for a US response, both military and financial, as it
infringed on the very foundation underpinning US exceptionalism - the
US$ petrodollar system, which helped to finance the “American Dream”
and sustain the world’s largest military expenditure equivalent to
the combined total of the next 8 countries’s military spending. The
US (Jew) media has gone overdrive to discredit the Maduro government
and the Trump administration has imposed sanctions on Venezuela. There
is a very high chance of an outright US invasion,probably in coordination
with Colombia, as a regime - change ops to remove Maduro failed in June.
The inevitable weakening of the US$ petrodollar system has quickened in
the coming months, as more and more countries diversify away from the
US dollar.

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Wade Hampton III

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Re: US To Invade Venezuela?

PostThu Jan 18, 2018 1:55 pm

Prelude To Rothschild-Financed Invasion?

...By Francisco Toro January 17 at 5:45 PM
The Washington Post

Empty meat counters in a supermarket in Caracas, Venezuela,
on Jan. 9. (Marco Bello/Reuters)

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A friend recently sent me a photograph that tells a powerful
story about the situation Venezuelans find themselves in now.
It’s not a very good picture, really, just a blurry cellphone
shot of trash: some wrapping material, an old CD — the detritus
left behind after a store was looted last week in San Felix,
a city in the country’s southeast. And yet I can’t stop thinking
about it, because strewn about in the trash are at least a dozen
20-bolivar bills, small-denomination currency now so worthless
even looters didn’t think it was worth their time to stop and
pick them up. The photo stopped me dead in my tracks. In theory,
according to the “official” exchange rate, which long ago lost
even a hint of connection with reality, each of those bills is
worth $2. In fact, as Venezuela sinks deeper and deeper into the
first hyperinflation the Western Hemisphere has seen in a generation,
bolivar banknotes have come to be worth basically nothing: Each
bill is worth about $0.0001 at the current exchange rate, meaning
you need to have 100 of them to equal one penny.

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It’s easy to see why the thieves left them behind. Hyperinflation
is disorienting. Five or six years ago, the 500 bolivars on the
floor would’ve bought you a meal for two with wine at the best
restaurant in Caracas. As late as early last year, they would’ve
bought you at least a cup of coffee. At the end of 2016, they
still bought you a cup of café con leche, at least. Today, they
buy you essentially nothing … well, except for 132 gallons of the
world’s most extravagantly subsidized gasoline. Prices are now
rising more than 80 percent per month, according to the opposition -
led National Assembly’s Finance Committee. (The government itself
stopped publishing official inflation data long ago.) At that rate,
prices double every 34 days or so. Salaries lag far behind, leaving
more and more of the country to face outright hunger. Thus, the looting.

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Rule No. 1 of surviving hyperinflation is simple: Get rid of your money.
Given the speed with which money is shedding its value, holding on to
it means you’re losing out. The second you’re paid you run out as fast
as you can to buy something – anything – while you can still afford it.
It’s better to hold almost any asset than money, because assets hold
their value and money doesn’t. Find a can of tuna? Buy it. Even if you
hate tuna. Even if you have no intention of eating tuna. You can always
trade it for something else later. Tuna holds its value. Money doesn’t.
I think this is what’s so hard to wrap your mind around if you’ve never
experienced hyperinflation. It sounds like it’s about prices rising fast,
but it really isn’t. It’s about money breaking down. Under hyperinflation,
money no longer works. It doesn’t store value. It just stops doing the
basic things people expect money to do. It stops being something you want
to have and turns into something you’ll do anything to avoid having:
something so worthless you won’t even bend down and scoop it up off the
floor while you’re looting. And that’s what it’s come to, widespread,
state - aided looting. The final frontier in the collapse of Venezuela’s
economy and civic culture. How did we get here? Not so long ago, in 2015
and 2016, you probably remember reading about the long lines outside
virtually every supermarket for basic goods. Lines formed because the
government put price ceilings on all staple goods, and as you learn in
the first week of any introductory economics course, price controls breed
shortages.

And yet, paradoxically, the fact that those lines did form was a signal
that at least people expected they would find price - controlled goods
inside if they had the patience to brave the wait. So when lines began
to vanish late last year, it wasn’t a sign of improvement — shortages
had grown so bad that people gave up. Affordable staples just disappeared
from the shelves for good, leaving only luxury products at international
prices that only a minuscule elite could afford. Instead, the government
improvised a clumsy new system to deliver a package of staple goods to
people’s homes each month. Unsurprisingly, given the dire state of state
finances, that system soon broke down. Too few packages were reaching
too few homes, leaving a gap that could be filled only by looting stores
still selling expensive goods at international prices. Of course, few
stores will think of restocking after they’ve been looted, and virtually
none can find the capital to do so. So it looks as though we’re coming
to the end of the line: Every last avenue for people to put a meal on
the table has been exhausted. A video that went viral recently showed
Venezuelans literally running into a cow pasture to stone a calf to
death to try to get a meal.

How can Venezuelans go on? One thing is clear: No one in power much cares.

:oops:
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White Man 1

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Re: US To Invade Venezuela?

PostSat Jan 20, 2018 9:59 am

Venezuela could have learned a thing or two from our Jews in power. Hyperinflation in the United States is highly unlikely since the monetary system is so closely controlled for the maximum benefit of our chosenite overlords.

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