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An Interesting Universe

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Wade Hampton III

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An Interesting Universe

PostFri Dec 12, 2014 12:35 am

When someone mentions "different dimensions," we tend to think
of things like parallel universes – alternate realities that
exist parallel to our own, but where things work or happened
differently. However, the reality of dimensions and how they
play a role in the ordering of our Universe is really quite
different from this popular characterization:

http://phys.org/news/2014-12-universe-d ... s.html#jCp

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Wade Hampton III

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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostWed Dec 14, 2016 6:51 am

Supermassive Black Hole

Belinda Smith posted..

There's a limit to how big a supermassive black hole can become before it
stunts it own growth, calculations suggest. Kohei Inayoshi and Zoltan Haiman
from Columbia University in New York, US, modelled the evolution of a
supermassive black hole over the lifetime of the universe – 13.8 billion years
– and found once they get to around 10 billion times the mass of the sun,
they top out. At this point, the majority of the gas flowing to and feeding
a supermassive black hole instead gets caught in the surrounding disc,
triggering star formation light-years away and more than far enough to remain
safe from the black hole. Starved of fuel, the black hole slows growth. The
work, published in The Astrophysical Journal, explains why we don't detect
supermassive black holes more than ten billion solar masses today.

Most large galaxies, it's thought, harbour a supermassive black hole in their
centre. We have one in the centre of our galaxy, the Milky Way – it's thought
to be around 4.5 million times more massive than the sun. But it's tiny to some
of the monsters we've detected. Some are in the tens of billions of solar masses.
But that's as massive as they seem to get. Why is this? Inayoshi and Haiman
thought the process of rapid black hole growth could eventually be the very thing
that slows them. They decided to model it and see what happened. For a super-massive
black hole to grow larger than the largest we've seen, it would need to guzzle
around 1,000 solar masses each year. That fuel has to come from somewhere and as
time wears on, they must use gas from further afield. But once the gas is pulled
from the outer reaches of the galaxy, it gets stuck tens of hundreds of light-years
from the black hole. Food slows to a trickle. This, in turn, changes the physics
of the black hole's disc. The inner portion of the disc puffs up and blasts strong
jets, further suppressing feeding and thus, growth. The pair's upper limit size
calculations support another study published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal
Astronomical Society by the UK's University of Leicester's Andrew King in December
last year, which attributed slowed growth to fragmentation of the disc.

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https://cosmosmagazine.com/space/how-ma ... k-hole-get
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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostTue Dec 26, 2017 10:17 pm

The universe we live in may not be the only one out there. In fact, our
universe could be just one of an infinite number of universes making up
a "multiverse." Though the concept may stretch credulity, there's good
physics behind it. And there's not just one way to get to a multiverse
— numerous physics theories independently point to such a conclusion.
In fact, some experts think the existence of hidden universes is more
likely than not. Here are the five most plausible scientific theories
suggesting we live in a multiverse:
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https://www.space.com/18811-multiple-un ... 171226-sdc
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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostSat Feb 03, 2018 8:17 pm

Exo-Galactic Planets!

Matt Williams posted....

The first confirmed discovery of a planet beyond our Solar System (aka. an
Extrasolar Planet) was a groundbreaking event. And while the initial
discoveries were made using only ground-based observatories, and were
therefore few and far between, the study of exoplanets has grown
considerably with the deployment of space-based telescopes like the
Kepler space telescope.

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Really Out There!
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“This is an example of how powerful the techniques of analysis of
extragalactic microlensing can be. This galaxy is located 3.8 billion
light years away, and there is not the slightest chance of observing
these planets directly, not even with the best telescope one can
imagine in a science fiction scenario. However, we are able to study
them, unveil their presence and even have an idea of their masses.
This is very cool science.”

https://www.universetoday.com/138478/fi ... er-galaxy/
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostWed Mar 07, 2018 10:13 pm

Into A Black Hole. Brought to you by....

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Down Under
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Passing through a black hole could open up a whole new future, but it
would erase your past. Black holes just keep getting weirder. Now
researchers believe people can pass through them. It’s just that
your past will be erased even as your future becomes infinite.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JfjqUSLDdk&feature=youtu.be[/youtube]

It's a controversial idea. But an enticing one. A new study has once
again tackled the implications of a black hole’s event horizon — the
point beyond which not even light can escape its gravitational pull.
This time, mathematicians have been crunching the numbers to determine
if an object can cross this point of no return — and travel beyond. It’s
generally thought an even horizon is an impenetrable line in space and
time. Whatever goes over the edge is lost, forever.

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Gone For Good!
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Many astrophysicists say what’s inside is impossible to study. The laws
of physics break down to a point where they’re simply incomprehensible.
But one international team of researchers have been busily poking holes
in this assumption. Their research, published in the journal Physical
Review Letters, looks at a particular type of black hole.

It must be calm. It must be supermassive. It must be electrically charged.
It must sit in an expanding and accelerating universe (like our own). They
argue these conditions open up a path enabling someone to pass through to
what lies beyond — without being “spaghettified” down to elemental components.

There is a problem, though. Your past would evaporate. And an infinite number
of futures would open up for you. All at once.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/scien ... 0ddfb97c3d
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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostSun Sep 08, 2019 9:01 pm

The biggest planet currently known in the universe is planet TrES-4.
It is located in the constellation Hercules. It is 70% larger than
Jupiter in diameter, but has only 80% of Jupiter's mass. As this
planet orbits very closely around its sun, the gases of the planet
expand due to the intense heat and cause the density of the planet
to become similar to a marshmallow:
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Planets
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The largest known star in the observable universe is UY Scuti. It
is located in the Constellation of Scutum. It has a diameter of
1,500,000,000 miles, a radius of 750,000,000 miles, and a
circumference of 4,712,388,980 miles.
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Stars
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostWed Sep 11, 2019 12:43 am

The Universe (everything that there is) came from nothing?
Because time warps into a space dimension at the beginning
of the Big Bang, there is a space there that has no time,
and thus has no beginning or end. This space is eternal,
and can be referred to as ‘nothing’, if you wish, or could
be simply called an empty space. If there is a law of gravity,
our Universe can and will arise from this kind of nothing.
It is important that we are not talking about absolutely nothing,
like the philosophers or theologians do, but about an actual
thing
with dynamic properties that is known to produce things
from itself:

https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-1 ... 5ab0d83f48

Nothing produces virtual particles in pairs that quickly meet
back up to annihilate one another, and if this happens on an
event horizon, the pair are separated forever, cannot meet back
up to annihilate, and thus become real particles with a
permanent existence. It turns out that not even nothing is
truly nothing. In fact, absolutely nothing seems to be against
the laws of physics.
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Something From Nothing?
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If a Cosmotheist could travel backward in time toward the beginning
of our Universe, he or she would note that - quite near what might
have otherwise been the beginning - time gives way to space such that
at first there is only space and no time. Beginnings are entities
that have to do with time; because time did not exist before the Big
Bang, the concept of a beginning of the universe is meaningless.
Put another way, there is no clear Big Bang and no boundary to
space-time.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostSun Sep 15, 2019 5:54 pm

Time and space cannot exist separately - or at least we cannot imagine the two of them separately. That being said, we live in a 4-dimensional universe, not a 3-dimensional as many people think, because we have to add time to the 3 dimensions of space. Furthermore, time and space might be part of the same thing (whatever that thing is), but we perceive them separately. Mass bends time and space - a larger mass means a stronger gravitational force. A stronger gravitational force means a greater “bending” of time and space. In other words time “flows“ differently near large masses while space is distorted (If you have seen Interstellar, when Matthew McConaughey prepares to jump through the wormhole towards the end of the movie, he says: “This will cost us about 70 years.” The human mind fractures space and time in order to process them - time and space are continuous and from our planetary position at the outer region of one of the spiral arms of the Milky Way galaxy they seem infinite and constant. On the other hand, the human mind has limited resources when it comes to processing the information coming from the environment. So, the human mind fractures time and space (and maps them) in order to be able to process them. Remember that we have minutes, seconds, hours, days, months, years and so on? Or that we have continents, countries, regions, cities, districts and so on → that being said, theoretical physics speculates the existence of 10 dimensions of space, which in case they exist, our mind surely is not equipped to perceive and process them.
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Re: An Interesting Universe

PostTue Oct 08, 2019 2:35 pm

The Earth, the entire Solar system for that matter, is some 26,540LY from the center of the galaxy. The latest estimates place the radius of the Milky Way at between 80–100kLY. So, between 1/3 and 1/4 of the way out. Caucasians - along with the other two races of mankind - are on the inner edge of the Orion ‘Arm’, a spur between the Scutum-Centaurus (inward) Arm and the Perseus Arm (outward). Outside the Perseus Arm is the Outer Arm.
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Lots Of Real Estate
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https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... milky-way/

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