Breaking Bread

Regarding children, family, and the home.
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White Man 1
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Breaking Bread

Post by White Man 1 » Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:06 am

I think bread recipes would be a good addition to this subforum. I have played with dozens of recipes but always come back to this one.

Ingredients
1 (1/4-ounce) packet active dry yeast or 2 1/4 teaspoons instant yeast
1 tablespoon (14g) sugar
1 tablespoon (14g) salt
2 cups (454g) lukewarm water (not over 110°F)
5 1/2 to 6 cups (663g to 723g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
cornmeal or semolina for sprinkling on the pan, optional

-Combine all ingredients and kneed well

-Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl large enough for it to at least double in size. Cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm, draft-free place (your turned-off oven works well) until the dough doubles, about 1 to 2

-To shape the dough: Gently deflate the dough. Cut it in half and shape into two oval Italian- or longer, thinner French-style loaves. Place the loaves on a baking sheet lined with parchment (if you have it) and generously sprinkled with cornmeal or semolina. The cornmeal or semolina are optional, but give the bottom crust lovely crunch.

-Let the loaves rise, gently covered in greased plastic wrap, for 45 minutes, until they're noticeably puffy. Toward the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 425°F.

-To bake the bread: Brush or spray the loaves generously with lukewarm water; this step, which helps keep the top crust pliant while baking, will enhance the bread's rise. Lightly slash the tops of the loaves three or more times diagonally. Place the pan on the middle rack of the oven.

-Bake the bread for 35 to 40 minutes, until the crust is golden brown and sounds hollow to the touch. The interior temperature of the bread should register at least 200°F on a digital thermometer.

-Remove the loaves from the oven, take them off the pan, and return them to the oven, placing them right on the rack. Turn the oven off and crack the door open several inches. Let the loaves cool in the cooling oven; this will make them extra-crusty.

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Grimork
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Re: Breaking Bread

Post by Grimork » Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:15 am

Thanks for sharing WM1. My husband loves homemade bread so I will have to try this one out. I wonder if it would work in a little rectangular bread pan? Shaping things is not my forte, I cannot decorate cakes either, go figure. :arrow:

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White Man 1
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Re: Breaking Bread

Post by White Man 1 » Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:18 am

Grimork wrote:
Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:15 am
Thanks for sharing WM1. My husband loves homemade bread so I will have to try this one out. I wonder if it would work in a little rectangular bread pan? Shaping things is not my forte, I cannot decorate cakes either, go figure. :arrow:
It would probably work in a bread pan, but I prefer the traditional loaf because you get a better crust. Really not much goes into shaping, I just chop it in half and plop it down on a baking sheet with a sprinkle of grits.

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Grimork
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Re: Breaking Bread

Post by Grimork » Fri Oct 16, 2020 1:22 pm

I can just plop it? Ok I'll try. 8-) I'm a southern gal, you know we got grits ha! I've never tried it on bread but it sounds good.

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White Man 1
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Re: Breaking Bread

Post by White Man 1 » Fri Oct 16, 2020 2:20 pm

The grits are just on the pan to keep the bread from sticking. That way you don't have to use any oils or paper under it. I also like to throw a cup of water into the bottom of the oven before putting the bread in to give it a nicer crust

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