Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Summaries and links to news items
Benjamin Bice
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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Benjamin Bice » Sat Aug 08, 2020 6:56 pm

Teacher Unconstitutionally Fired for Facebook Post Rejecting Concept of ‘White Privilege’

By Hans Bader | August 6, 2020 | 5:18pm EDT

An Illinois high school teacher was fired on July 16 for a Facebook post rejecting the idea of "white privilege." That violated the First Amendment, even if some people viewed her Facebook post as racially inflammatory.

Speech doesn't become punishable just because it offends members of minority groups. For example, in Thompson v. Board of Education of Chicago (1989), a court ruled that a teacher’s remarks to a newspaper about problems in the Chicago school system (such as gang activity) were constitutionally protected, even though "individuals in the community had expressed outrage over the remarks," and viewed them "as racist and inflammatory."



Mediavine
As Tom Parker notes:

"Jeanne Hedgepeth, a Palatine High School, Illinois, social studies teacher, has been fired over one of her social media posts after the Township High School District 211 board members voted 5-2 to terminate her employment.

'I am about facts, truth-seeking and love,' Hedgepeth wrote in the Facebook post that led to her termination. 'I will speak on any topic I choose because I live in a free country. I find the term ‘white privilege’ as racist as the ‘N’ word. You have not walked in my shoes either so do not make assumptions about me and my so called privilege. You think America is racist? Then you’ve been hoodwinked by the white liberal establishment and race baiters like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton. Travel the world and go see that every nation has racism and some more than others but few make efforts such as we do to mitigate or eliminate it.'

She also recommended the work of economist Thomas Sowell, political commentator and activist Candace Owens, and author and radio host Larry Elder.

Additionally, Hedgepeth argued that there is a 'deeper problem than racism.' She finished by recommending that the black community should stop believing 'Democrats, mainstream media and intellectuals in ivory towers.'"



Mediavine
There is no doubt that she was fired for her speech by Palatine-Schaumburg High School District 211, judging from the news story about her firing in the Daily Herald.

"The statements in the post do not reflect the values or principles of District 211," the district said in a statement at the time. "We are truly sorry for any harm or disrespect that this may have caused."

But schools are not entitled to punish speech about political and social issues just because they think it violates their "values or principles." For example, a college's discipline of a fraternity was overturned by a court on First Amendment grounds, even though the fraternity's racially insensitive skit was at odds with the university's "mission statement" of teaching "values of equal opportunity and equal treatment" and "respect for diversity." (See Iota Xi Chapter of Sigma Chi Fraternity v. George Mason University (1993)).

Similarly, a white professor's racially-charged anti-immigration emails were ruled protected speech by an appeals court, even though they offended Hispanic college staff, who viewed the emails as racist. (See Rodriguez v. Maricopa Community College District (2010)).

High schools can punish speech by their employees that is seriously disruptive or prevents them from carrying out their duties. But they can't punish an employee just for saying something that is insensitive, or angers some in the community.

The teacher also can't be punished because she disapprovingly compared "white privilege" to the "n-word," viewing both as racist. She didn't even say the word "n****r," she just referred to it as the "n-word." And even using the n-word in full has been held to be protected speech by instructors, when they are discussing the word, not aiming it at a black person. For example, a federal appeals court ruled that an instructor could say the n-word in full while discussing the historical oppression of black people. (See Hardy v. Jefferson Community College (2001)).

The teacher, Jeanne Hedgepeth, views the idea that whites are privileged ("white privilege") as discriminatory against whites. Whether one agrees with her or not, she is alleging reverse discrimination. And speech alleging reverse discrimination is speech protected by the First Amendment, because it addresses a matter of public concern.

For example, a prison guard's angry diatribe against affirmative action was ruled protected speech by a California state appeals court. (See California Department of Corrections v. State Personnel Board (1997)).

Similarly, a federal appeals court ruled that the First Amendment protected an "assistant fire chief in charge of personnel" from being fired for expressing views at odds with his city's own "policy on affirmative action" to a minority-advocacy group. (See Meyers v. City of Cincinnati (1991)).

Even if one disagrees with Hedgepeth about whether the concept of "white privilege" discriminates against whites by deeming all whites privileged, it doesn't mean she can be fired. The First Amendment protects even misguided views and faulty assumptions. As judges have explained, “erroneous statements of public concern will be protected unless they are shown to have interfered with the employee’s performance or the regular operation of his governmental agency." (See Brasslet v. Cota (1985)).

Speech complaining of reverse discrimination can be protected by the First Amendment or the civil-rights laws even if the "discrimination" complained of turns out to be legal. For example, a court ruled that a worker was wrongly fired for complaining about his employer's affirmative-action plan, even though the court concluded that the affirmative action plan was legal. (See Sisco v. J.S. Alberici Const. Co. (1981)).

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Benjamin Bice
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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Benjamin Bice » Sat Aug 08, 2020 7:02 pm

Democratic Leaders Call for Canceling History Classes Because of Racism

By Jake Dima
Published August 3, 2020 at 12:53pm

Chicago-area leaders urged the Illinois State Board of Education on Sunday to halt history classes that “unfairly” communicate history until an “alternative” can be found.

Democratic state Rep. LaShawn Ford of Chicago said the current state history curriculum leads to a “racist society” and may cause “white privilege” before a Sunday news conference in Evanston in a release obtained by WMAQ-TV.

Image

In the release, Ford called to replace courses and books that “unfairly communicate” history until a “suitable alternative is developed.”

“When it comes to teaching history in Illinois, we need to end the miseducation of Illinoisans,” Ford said in the release.

“I’m calling on the Illinois State Board of Education and local school districts to take immediate action by removing current history books and curriculum practices that unfairly communicate our history,” the legislator said.

“Until a suitable alternative is developed, we should instead devote greater attention toward civics and ensuring students understand our democratic processes and how they can be involved,” he continued.

Evanston Mayor Steve Hagerty, a Democrat, said, according to the release, “As Mayor, I am not comfortable speaking on education, curriculum, and whether history lessons should be suspended. This is not my area.”

He continued, “Personally, I support House Bill 4954 because I am interested in learning more and believe the history of Black people should be taught to all children and include all groups, Women, LatinX, and Native Indians who helped to build America.”

Meleika Gardner of We Will said in the release that “miseducation” has led to “systemic racism.”

We Will is an organization dedicated to women’s empowerment, according to its webpage.

“It is urgent that it comes to an end as we witness our current climate become more hostile,” Gardner said. “Miseducation has fed and continues to feed systemic racism for generations. If Black History continues to be devalued and taught incorrectly, then it will call for further action.”

Increased racial tensions have followed the May 25 death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody.

Chicago recently removed two Christopher Columbus statues that were the subject of violent protests between officers and demonstrators.

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Will Williams
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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Will Williams » Sat Aug 08, 2020 7:25 pm

Benjamin Bice wrote:
Sat Aug 08, 2020 7:02 pm
Democratic Leaders Call for Canceling History Classes Because of Racism

[...]

Meleika Gardner of We Will said in the release that “miseducation” has led to “systemic racism.”...

“It is urgent that it comes to an end as we witness our current climate become more hostile,” Gardner said. “Miseducation has fed and continues to feed systemic racism for generations. If Black History continues to be devalued and taught incorrectly, then it will call for further action.”
We Whites must cease teaching our children our history. That's "miseducation." It only leads to "systematic racism."

What we need is more Black history, like Dr. Pierce told us about that's in the Harriet Tubman African American Museum in Macon, Georgia:

---

...The museum is the federally funded Tubman African American Museum. It’s supported by our tax dollars... It is named after Harriet Tubman, a Black slave who was employed by Abolitionist organizations in the North during the period just before the Civil War to induce other slaves in the South to leave their plantations and head north along the so-called “Underground Railroad.” [Museum visitors are given] a lecture on the history and accomplishments of Negroes, and each [is] handed a sheet headed “African American Inventor’s” (sic) listing 120 or so things supposedly invented by Blacks.

Here are the first six items on the list of Black inventions: the pyramids, paper, chess, the alphabet, medicine, and civilization. After this start the rest of the list is a bit anticlimactic, with such items as the doorknob, the mop, the curtain rod, peanut butter, and the helicopter.

With the exception of peanut butter, which is generally credited to Black agricultural technician George Washington Carver, this list is so fantastic that most of us get a good chuckle when we read it
... More, here: https://nationalvanguard.org/2015/07/br ... -children/
---

I sure have a good chuckle whenever I hear about these African American inventions. What they don't tell visitors at the Harriet Tubman African American Museum is that African Americans had to wait for Aryans to invent the door and the window before they could invent the doorknob and the curtain rod. :lol:

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C.E. Whiteoak
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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by C.E. Whiteoak » Tue Aug 11, 2020 1:40 pm

With the exception of peanut butter, which is generally credited to Black agricultural technician George Washington Carver, this list is so fantastic that most of us get a good chuckle when we read it...


If it were not White inventions like the spoon, the knife and the glass jar, Congoids would have to daub their peanut butter on a flat rock and eat it with a stick. :roll:

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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Benjamin Bice » Thu Sep 03, 2020 3:35 pm

University English Teacher Restricts 'Disparaging Commentary' In Class That Perpetuates Racial Disharmony

P. Gardner Goldsmith , @gardgoldsmith
September. 1. 2020

There’s an adage in politics and propaganda that people interested in gaining government power must “control the narrative,” and it certainly looks like a University of Louisville English instructor teaching a “101” class this fall is ready to do just that – all to push the narrative of “systemic racism” in contemporary America.

According to The College Fix’s Charles Hilu:

An English 101 class offered this semester at University of Louisville is focused on antiracism and forbids ‘disruptive language’ and ‘disparaging commentary,’ according to its syllabus.

All of which could be fine - if that were spelled-out clearly, the assumptions underlying what is “racism” were close to fair, and students were the only ones paying for the classes. But none of the previous criteria are met in this class entitled, “Introduction to College Writing: Commemoration and Public Memory” and taught by graduate teaching assistant Kendyl Harmeling.

In fact, Harmeling’s class syllabus includes this introduction:

2020 marks 157 years since the Emancipation Proclamation, and fewer for the years since chattel slavery as an American institution was formally ended across the union. These are facts which came after and were followed by the American system of race-based classification, which has resulted in the denigration of groups of people based on color. This system is still active today with race-specific rules for behavior, demographic wealth gaps, disrupted access to resources, and on. This is the America some of us were born in, from our ancestors through indigeneity, through those who came here by choice, and those who came here by force.

So, of course, “systemic racism” must be responsible for “demographic wealth gaps” and “disrupted access to resources.” Just don’t mention the fact that, until the COVID19 crackdowns by numerous politicians, employment in the US had skyrocketed – and that included the lowest recorded unemployment figures for black and Hispanic residents as of October of 2019. And don’t ask instructor Harmeling what she means by “resources” or “access to resources,” since resources are products of human discovery, recognition, supply, use, and refinement – and all of those depend on the wills of individuals in a free market for their proper appearance and attenuation.

Just keep repeating overblown and erroneous propaganda to perpetuate envy and resentment without any recognition of the processes by which people grow wealthy and all “boats are lifted” by a rising economic tide.

But wait! There’s more in this lovely University of Louisville offer! Writes Hilu:

Harmeling also instructs students to ‘employ inclusive language, which shows that the writer honors the diversity of the human race by not using language that would universalize one element of humanity to the exclusion of others.’ She asks students to use ‘men and women’ or ‘people’ rather than simply ‘man.’ Students are also asked to use ‘they’ rather than ‘he/she.’

And part of what Ms. Harmeling asks is something that can stand as an offering of preference. Sure, she departs from generations of the normative “he” and “mankind,” but it’s understandable that some folks might want to change that standard.

The use of the plural pronoun “they” in place of a singular for a non-gender-specific human subject is problematic. Even if one does not know the identity or gender of a person, one logically cannot use the plural pronoun “they” (or its variants) to describe a single person. Yes, Webster changed its rules on this in 2019, but the editorial team at Webster is incorrect.

To prove it, consider a couple examples. Say, for example, a television news reader tells an ever-dwindling audience:

City police say they have arrested the individual suspected of starting three arson fires in the past month. Officials have not released the identity of the suspect, but say THEY will be arraigned on Tuesday.

That’s simply incorrect and confusing. How many people were arrested? One, or more than one? After all, at first, the reporter said a single suspect had been arrested, but then the reporter said “they”, implying more than one, would be arraigned on Tuesday. Since the reporter did not know the gender of the suspect, the reporter used a plural for a single person.

Then there’s the emergency room. Ask any medical worker banging the boards inside an emergency room what info an EMT needs to offer as a team transports a victim, and you’ll immediately find out that medical teams don’t mess around with plural pronouns and “gender-fancy” language. Those workers need to know how many victims are en route, what they suffer (so far as it can be ascertained) and the gender of the victim, as well as general age, weight, and other factors that play a major role in preparing to receive the patient.

nd on a more philosophical level, the use of “they” for a single person turns people away from recognition of people as individuals, throwing each person into the realm of “the plural," stripping each person of the dignity of autonomy. That’s a dangerous phenomenon in a nation-state already rife with collectivist, autocratic rules and a collectivist education system.

The way to manage pronoun “fairness” without sacrificing logic is to use “he or she” when one is uncertain of the gender. Even that becomes clunky at times, and one can be forced to rearrange syntax to get around mentioning the pronoun at all, but it’s far better than misusing “they” because of politically-correct language police.

It’s perfectly fine for a teacher to offer to students a biased, race-baiting, economically myopic English class. People can read about it, attend it, and debate its merits or demerits.

It’s another to suck tax cash off others to pay for it. And, of course, since the University of Louisville is tax subsidized, that’s precisely what this “Introduction to College Writing: Commemoration and Public Memory” class is. Just a few months ago, GOP Senator Mitch McConnell’s office announced $4 million “federal” bucks would be headed to the school, something that forces non-attendees, and non-Kentucky residents, to pay, and something that is not sanctioned by the Constitution McConnell swore to uphold.

And, of course, the University of Louisville gets millions in state tax funds every year.

So one might ask Ms. Harmeling if she plans on discussing this unfairness – the unfairness that sees her opinions subsidized by others under threat of arrest for tax evasion, the unfairness that sees the promulgation of race-baiting propaganda paid for by people who might disagree.

It’s doubtful Ms. Harmeling does plan on discussing those facts.

Which is educational in itself.

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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Benjamin Bice » Thu Sep 03, 2020 3:35 pm

University English Teacher Restricts 'Disparaging Commentary' In Class That Perpetuates Racial Disharmony

P. Gardner Goldsmith , @gardgoldsmith
September. 1. 2020

There’s an adage in politics and propaganda that people interested in gaining government power must “control the narrative,” and it certainly looks like a University of Louisville English instructor teaching a “101” class this fall is ready to do just that – all to push the narrative of “systemic racism” in contemporary America.

According to The College Fix’s Charles Hilu:

An English 101 class offered this semester at University of Louisville is focused on antiracism and forbids ‘disruptive language’ and ‘disparaging commentary,’ according to its syllabus.

All of which could be fine - if that were spelled-out clearly, the assumptions underlying what is “racism” were close to fair, and students were the only ones paying for the classes. But none of the previous criteria are met in this class entitled, “Introduction to College Writing: Commemoration and Public Memory” and taught by graduate teaching assistant Kendyl Harmeling.

In fact, Harmeling’s class syllabus includes this introduction:

2020 marks 157 years since the Emancipation Proclamation, and fewer for the years since chattel slavery as an American institution was formally ended across the union. These are facts which came after and were followed by the American system of race-based classification, which has resulted in the denigration of groups of people based on color. This system is still active today with race-specific rules for behavior, demographic wealth gaps, disrupted access to resources, and on. This is the America some of us were born in, from our ancestors through indigeneity, through those who came here by choice, and those who came here by force.

So, of course, “systemic racism” must be responsible for “demographic wealth gaps” and “disrupted access to resources.” Just don’t mention the fact that, until the COVID19 crackdowns by numerous politicians, employment in the US had skyrocketed – and that included the lowest recorded unemployment figures for black and Hispanic residents as of October of 2019. And don’t ask instructor Harmeling what she means by “resources” or “access to resources,” since resources are products of human discovery, recognition, supply, use, and refinement – and all of those depend on the wills of individuals in a free market for their proper appearance and attenuation.

Just keep repeating overblown and erroneous propaganda to perpetuate envy and resentment without any recognition of the processes by which people grow wealthy and all “boats are lifted” by a rising economic tide.

But wait! There’s more in this lovely University of Louisville offer! Writes Hilu:

Harmeling also instructs students to ‘employ inclusive language, which shows that the writer honors the diversity of the human race by not using language that would universalize one element of humanity to the exclusion of others.’ She asks students to use ‘men and women’ or ‘people’ rather than simply ‘man.’ Students are also asked to use ‘they’ rather than ‘he/she.’

And part of what Ms. Harmeling asks is something that can stand as an offering of preference. Sure, she departs from generations of the normative “he” and “mankind,” but it’s understandable that some folks might want to change that standard.

The use of the plural pronoun “they” in place of a singular for a non-gender-specific human subject is problematic. Even if one does not know the identity or gender of a person, one logically cannot use the plural pronoun “they” (or its variants) to describe a single person. Yes, Webster changed its rules on this in 2019, but the editorial team at Webster is incorrect.

To prove it, consider a couple examples. Say, for example, a television news reader tells an ever-dwindling audience:

City police say they have arrested the individual suspected of starting three arson fires in the past month. Officials have not released the identity of the suspect, but say THEY will be arraigned on Tuesday.

That’s simply incorrect and confusing. How many people were arrested? One, or more than one? After all, at first, the reporter said a single suspect had been arrested, but then the reporter said “they”, implying more than one, would be arraigned on Tuesday. Since the reporter did not know the gender of the suspect, the reporter used a plural for a single person.

Then there’s the emergency room. Ask any medical worker banging the boards inside an emergency room what info an EMT needs to offer as a team transports a victim, and you’ll immediately find out that medical teams don’t mess around with plural pronouns and “gender-fancy” language. Those workers need to know how many victims are en route, what they suffer (so far as it can be ascertained) and the gender of the victim, as well as general age, weight, and other factors that play a major role in preparing to receive the patient.

nd on a more philosophical level, the use of “they” for a single person turns people away from recognition of people as individuals, throwing each person into the realm of “the plural," stripping each person of the dignity of autonomy. That’s a dangerous phenomenon in a nation-state already rife with collectivist, autocratic rules and a collectivist education system.

The way to manage pronoun “fairness” without sacrificing logic is to use “he or she” when one is uncertain of the gender. Even that becomes clunky at times, and one can be forced to rearrange syntax to get around mentioning the pronoun at all, but it’s far better than misusing “they” because of politically-correct language police.

It’s perfectly fine for a teacher to offer to students a biased, race-baiting, economically myopic English class. People can read about it, attend it, and debate its merits or demerits.

It’s another to suck tax cash off others to pay for it. And, of course, since the University of Louisville is tax subsidized, that’s precisely what this “Introduction to College Writing: Commemoration and Public Memory” class is. Just a few months ago, GOP Senator Mitch McConnell’s office announced $4 million “federal” bucks would be headed to the school, something that forces non-attendees, and non-Kentucky residents, to pay, and something that is not sanctioned by the Constitution McConnell swore to uphold.

And, of course, the University of Louisville gets millions in state tax funds every year.

So one might ask Ms. Harmeling if she plans on discussing this unfairness – the unfairness that sees her opinions subsidized by others under threat of arrest for tax evasion, the unfairness that sees the promulgation of race-baiting propaganda paid for by people who might disagree.

It’s doubtful Ms. Harmeling does plan on discussing those facts.

Which is educational in itself.

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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Jim Mathias » Fri Sep 04, 2020 1:35 am

Forget education, they've gone over to full-blown indoctrination. Is there any real value to schools these days? It seems to be preparing young minds for civil war.
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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Benjamin Bice » Mon Sep 14, 2020 3:58 pm

Minnesota School Superintendent Welcomes Back Teachers, Tells Them to ‘Examine’ Their ‘Whiteness’

Minnesota is pushing for exams in schools, but not the kind you’d assume.

In a video published by Alpha News, Hopkins Public Schools Superintendent Rhoda Mhiripiri-Reed recently welcomed staff back to the ol’ grind.

But 2020’s not your typical year, and Rhoda had an unusual message for those returning from that great American retreat known as summer vacation/zombie apocalypse/murderous riots.

To get everyone ready for the new year, the superintendent pointed out we’re currently suffering two gargantuan infectious epidemics: the coronavirus and rampant racism.

Here’s how she introduced the topic:

“In our communications to staff and families, we have referenced a dual pandemic. Mr. George Floyd – rest in power – is seemingly the contemporary face of the pandemic of racial injustice.”

And she pointed out it’s nothing new:

“This pandemic of systemic racism has soiled this country, not just since slavery, but since the genocide of the Native Americans and the American Indians who resided on and cared for this land.”

Sounds like a real feel good “Welcome Back.”

Oh, and Rhoda explained the U.S. system is one of white supremacy:

“We need to examine the role that whiteness plays in our macro-system of white supremacy.”

So whose job it is to fix things? Everyone who isn’t anyone who’s not white:

“[It’s not the] responsibility of people of color to fix racism, or to explain to white people how not to be racist.”

To hear Rhoda tell it, whether you realize it or not, every moment of your existence is ensconced in racism the way George Costanza loves to be ensconced in velvet:

“Without blame or shame, we must recognize that we were conditioned to operate within a system of racism that pervades throughout every aspect of our daily existence. Yet each of us still has the responsibility to engage in self-education and self-analysis.”

So if you’re a teacher, how have you “reinforced a racist policy”? As reported by The Daily Caller, Rhoda wanted to know.

She told staff to “examine” their “racist beliefs.”

She’s done so herself, having “recognized the privilege of being light-skinned, well-educated, and being in a role that is given formal authority.”

So here’s the assignment — if you’re Caucasian, compute your fluke:

“If you are white and/or if you are privileged in another way, I ask you to engage in the same self-analysis to see your own privilege and to examine your whiteness.”

Rhoda wants everyone to take a “journey that begins with self-reflection” in order to become anti-racist.

And what, exactly, is anti-racist? Well, it isn’t simply not being racist.

In June, CNN served up a crash course:

Being anti-racist means more than ridding yourself of racist attitudes, beliefs and behaviors. It means you’re also actively fighting that reprehensible trinity as it manifests in your life on a daily basis.

Donating to activist organizations and protesting injustices are definitely good starts to becoming an ally. But that’s not enough. Actively rebutting prejudices in your own circles is key to lasting change, as those ideas and beliefs — unless challenged — are what our children absorb and are woven into the fabric of our culture.


Some white people know that to become anti-racist, they must start to listen and brush up on the history of racism in their countries.

Some people are describing obviously racist behavior as the the tip of the iceberg — calling people racist names or threatening people on the basis of race. Then there’s the part of the iceberg that’s not easily visible to people if they’re not looking. This includes a range of subtle but insidious attitudes, behaviors and policies.

Among these are microaggressions. They are brief and commonplace verbal, behavioral or environmental indignities, Tatum said.

Microaggressions can be intentional, unintentional or even well-meaning, but they communicate hostile, derogatory or negative racial assumptions to the receiver. And they have an insidious effect on a black person’s psyche and continuing racist assumptions.

Three such microaggressions:

“Don’t blame me. I never owned slaves.”
“All lives matter.”
“I’m colorblind; I don’t care if you’re white, black, yellow, green or purple.”
Back to Minnesota, the Caller notes Hopkins Public Schools isn’t much of an anomaly:

Numerous public schools across the country have initiated similar “anti-racism” efforts. In 2019, the Seattle Public Schools Ethnic Studies Advisory Committee (ESAC) released a rough draft of notes for its Math Ethnic Studies framework which attempts to connect math to a history of oppression, suggesting that math is subjective and racist.

“Who gets to say if an answer is right,” the committee suggest under one question, and under another, “how is math manipulated to allow inequality and oppression to persist?”

So they’re ya go.

But I’ll give contemporary education one thing: They may no longer subscribe to math or science or history or objectivity or grades or meritocracy…but at least they’re teaching philosophy.

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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Benjamin Bice » Mon Sep 14, 2020 4:13 pm

Veteran’s Mural To Be Removed Because It Shows “Too Many White People”

By Conservative Research Group -September 14, 2020

Image

The University of Rhode Island recently announced plans to remove a mural painted nearly 70 years ago. Student veterans created the Memorial Union back in 1954 at the University of Rhode Island to honor the military service of students and those who lost their lives in the war.

Kathy Collins, vice president of student affairs, shared that many students filed complaints on the folk-art mural. They said it portrayed a very homogeneous population and that there were “too many white people.” Students didn’t feel comfortable sitting in the space.

The university announced its plans to cover up and replace the mural before classes start.

“I think we have to recognize the horrible incidents [involving] George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and most recently Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, during this … heightened time, and we as an institution have to look at the systems in place across this institution that maybe are not representing who we are today and representing the true diversity of URI today,” Collins said.

World War II veteran and University alumni, Arthur Sherman, was the man who painted the mural. The 95-year-old artist was asked to draw cartoon-like murals in a Quonset hut that served as an earlier site for the student union.

“Oh, I loved painting that, yeah. I never had any formal education in painting by the way I just used to cartoon,” Sherman said about the mural. He talked about different parts of the mural that depicted the era. Students piled into cars in letter sweaters, class reunions, a beach scene, etc.

Sherman shared that “times goes by and things change” when asked about the removal of his mural. His daughter, Pamela Sherman, doesn’t agree.

“It’s terribly upsetting and we grew up with those murals being there. It’s an opportunity for the University of Rhode Island to embrace its history, it’s an opportunity for it to show a timeline, a progression, and a change over decades and we never want to forget our past,” Sherman said.

The painter’s daughter suggested putting new artwork alongside the pieces of history as a timeline of the evolution of the campus. She suggested the perspective should be to look at history and maintain the timeline. Not destroying it.

“Wouldn’t it be a mistake if we look back 100 years from now and say, ‘Isn’t it a tragedy that we lost this artwork? It’s like any work of art, especially a painting — seeing a picture of it is just no comparison to seeing it live,” Sherman asked.

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Re: Black/Non-White Institutional Racism

Post by Benjamin Bice » Fri Sep 25, 2020 10:49 pm

Judicial Watch and Legal Insurrection Investigate University Retaliation against Professor Who Questioned ‘Systemic Racism’

SEPTEMBER 16, 2020
|
JUDICIAL WATCH

Professor Charles Negy targeted after raising questions about leftist positions on race

(Washington, DC) Judicial Watch announced today that it has joined with Legal Insurrection Foundation to file a Florida public records request for communications at the University of Central Florida (UCF) related to Professor Charles Negy, who was attacked by campus leftists and the university administration after he raised questions about systemic racism.

In August, Legal Insurrection wrote that “After Negy questioned claims of ‘systemic racism’ and asserted ‘black privilege is real,’ [referring to affirmative action, etc.] there has been a university-wide pile-on, with Negy alleging UCF is soliciting complaints against him and conducting an abusive investigation in an effort to justify firing him.”

The UCF student senate passed a resolution asking for Negy’s termination, and there were protests on campus and at Negy’s home.

UCF President Alexander Cartwright participated in a campus protest an also took to social media, tweeting, “we do not tolerate hate speech and must be unequivocally anti-racist in our words, actions and online behavior. Whenever we find discrimination in our community, we will take decisive action to stamp it out.” Michael Johnson, the interim provost, told The New York Times that Negy’s views are “vile.”

Negy reportedly “has worked at UCF since 1998 and earned tenure in 2001, a status that can make it harder to fire him.”

The public records request asks for records mentioning Negy, Cartwright, and other university officials, as well as communications with governmental and professional academic organizations regarding Negy.

“The scourge of cancel culture won’t be cured in a matter of days, weeks, or even months. But sunlight is the best disinfectant, and we are committed to shining a light on the Negy case and other cases as well,” said William Jacobson, president, Legal Insurrection Foundation.

“Freedom of speech is under attack at the very institutions that should be encouraging it,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “Intellectual discourse on college campuses has now been replaced by angry mobs trying to silence and end the careers of professors who present nuanced views.”

https://www.judicialwatch.org/press-rel ... a3dqLLfelE
Professor of Anti-White Discrimination and Racial Hypocrisy

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