It is currently Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:39 am


Lusitania Telegraph Recovered!

  • Author
  • Message
Offline
User avatar

Wade Hampton III

  • Posts: 983
  • Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 10:40 pm
  • Location: Pontiac, SC

Lusitania Telegraph Recovered!

PostSat Jul 29, 2017 8:33 am

The Lusitania was the largest ship in the world when it made its maiden voyage
in 1907. The British ship was bound for Liverpool after a transatlantic crossing
in 1915, when it was struck by a torpedo from a German submarine off the southeast
coast of Ireland during World War I. It sank in just 18 minutes.

sinking.JPG
sinking.JPG (64.49 KiB) Viewed 107 times


Of the 1,962 passengers and crew aboard at the time, 1,198 died, most of them
from drowning and hypothermia. The attack on civilians prompted diplomatic
outrage (though there is still debate over whether the ship's cargo secretly
included war supplies and munitions). As 128 Americans were killed in the
disaster, the event helped push the United States into World War I..

Wade says "...so that the Jews would get US into the war in exchange for the
Balfour Declaration":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balfour_Declaration

Many of those who drowned were trapped in the electric powered elevators which
soon went dead after the immediate flooding of the vessel:

https://www.livescience.com/59973-teleg ... tification
Offline

PhuBai68

  • Posts: 8
  • Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2017 3:23 pm

Re: Lusitania Telegraph Recovered!

PostSat Jul 29, 2017 12:23 pm

Supposedly Germany actually posted warnings in US newspapers that there was a state of war and for Americans not to book passage on British ships but only a couple newspapers printed the warnings.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/ ... d-1/seq-3/

https://jamesperloff.com/2014/05/21/false-flag-at-sea/

Gaunt visited the Du Pont munitions plant in Christfield, New Jersey, and Du Pont thereupon shipped tons of pyroxyline, packaged in burlap, to the Cunard wharf in New York City, where it was loaded onto the Lusitania. It quite evidently accounts for the item on the ship’s manifest of 3,813 40-pound containers of “cheese,” which were shipped along with 696 containers of “butter.” That these packages were not butter and cheese is clear: they were not shipped in refrigerated compartments; their destination was listed as the Royal Navy’s Weapons Testing Establishment; and no one filed an insurance claim for the lost “butter and cheese.”

Return to The Twentieth Century

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron