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Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostSat May 13, 2017 9:15 pm

Something to consider on Eclipse Day...


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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostTue May 16, 2017 11:39 am

Has the Earth-Moon system ever approached another nearby star?

Huard Smith, posted on March 9th...

Scholz’s star, now about 20 light years away, passed close to
the outer reaches of our solar system about 70,000 years ago
- when Neanderthals and Cro-Magnon humans were alive and kicking.
It is a binary system and it was just 8/10ths of a light year,
or about 52,000 AUs from our Sun at its closest approach. Scholz’s
star is a small red dwarf, about 15% of the mass of our Sun and
has a brown dwarf companion. It is what is called an “Oort Cloud
perturber”. The researchers (see added abstract below) note that
any perturbation of a long-period object out there would not
manifest itself in the inner solar system for ~2 million years.
So no need to worry.


Rajiv Chaube, lives in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India (1991-present)
posted on Mar 9th...

I think I read about this once in an article on ‘Universe Today’.
It stated that a star did pass pretty close to our Solar System
only 70,000 years ago. It was the closest flyby ever recorded.
In fact someone also wrote a report on this. I am not sure what
this was called. I do remember the name of the start that flew
by though. I think it was called Scholz’s Star. It got as close
as 7.4 Trillion Kilometers at the closest to the Sun. That is
like, almost a light year. To get this into one picture, the
closest stellar neighbor Proxima Centauri is around 4 light
years away. Scholz’s star was still close enough to affect
orbits of comets in the Oort Cloud.


Scholzs-and-the-OortCloud.jpg
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostFri May 19, 2017 6:39 am

Remnants of a lost technology:

what-a-mission.JPG
Apollo
what-a-mission.JPG (49.45 KiB) Viewed 677 times


Synonymous with the rise of "flat-earthers" and miscegenators. Mulattoes, Quadroons, and Octoroons will
never set a foot on Luna. A trampoline is as close as they will ever get.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostSun May 21, 2017 11:58 am

Countdown to Darkness: Total Solar Eclipse Three Months Away!
By Nola Taylor Redd, Space.com Contributor | May 21, 2017 07:20am ET

This one is a must-watch! Super-kewel video and snaps!

Three months from today (May 21), a shadow of darkness will travel
across the United States in the middle of the day. The portion of
the country that falls under this shadow will experience a total
solar eclipse, an incredible phenomenon that occurs when the moon
completely covers the disk of the sun. Here are just a few of the
things you'll need to know as you count down to this rare experience:

http://www.space.com/36933-total-solar- ... tification

Nola Taylor Redd is a contributing writer for Space.com. She loves
all things space and astronomy-related, and enjoys the opportunity
to learn more. She has a Bachelor’s degree in English and Astrophysics
from Agnes Scott college and served as an intern at Sky & Telescope
magazine. In her free time, she homeschools her four children.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostMon May 22, 2017 8:21 pm

Prepare!

To prepare for the total solar eclipse that will cross
the continental United States on Aug. 21, 2017, Space.com
has been reading up. Here is our selection of books that
will illuminate the history of the celestial events, teach
you about the science that's done while the sky is dark,
and help you take full advantage of the rare event. Plus,
we'll give you our picks for the best books for younger
and middle-school-age kids. These titles are great at
teaching kids about the sky and explaining how to watch
the eclipse. [Total Solar Eclipse 2017: When, Where and
How to See It (Safely)]

http://www.space.com/36879-best-solar-e ... tification

http://monsterhuntermoviereviews.com/wp ... deSun3.jpg
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostMon May 22, 2017 11:46 pm

As Eclipse Day approaches, so do interesting questions...

Is it possible that the Moon core is full of diamond and gold?

Majoj Majoj, PhD Physics, posted...

Actually, Moon has something better than gold and diamonds ;)
It’s not in the core, however. And it’s not a solid body like
gold or diamond. It is a helium isotope - He3, that came with
the solar wind and got adsorbed in the porous rocks at the
Moon’s surface. Several years ago a liter of gaseous He3 was
worth over $5000… Get it? LITER OF GAS. If you liquefy it you
get one milliliter… A mere droplet (that actually needs a
temperature of -270 Celsius degrees to exist). And still,
nobody wants to sell it!

He3.JPG
Expensive
He3.JPG (11.79 KiB) Viewed 645 times


He3 is used in neutron detectors at the airports, for some
medical diagnostics, in low temperature science and could be
used to produce INSANE amounts of energy through the nuclear
fusion process. If we only had enough of it… There are crazy
plans to travel to the moon to extract He3 and bring it back
here. I doubt anybody would move their ass so far away for
a couple of diamonds. This is how reality beats even the
most crazy dreams ;)



Can you see city lights from the Moon?

Fred Bruan, Linux Software Developer (1996-present) posted...

People always ask me (Mitchell) what its like on the moon.
We’re too damned busy and scared to make a mistake to really
notice much. Our time is very scripted, that’s a good thing.
As lunar module pilot I had a helluva lot to do to get the
LEM ready for the descent to Fra Mauro and return. After
we left lunar orbit, I didn’t have anything to do but
look out the spacecraft window.

It was make work really, and a bad idea. So, we blast off the
Moon at the optimum phase angle, and boost for about 7 minutes.
We wait until the phase angle closes to our CSI, concentric
sequence initiation. That puts us into an elliptical orbit. We
are climbing toward the CM as we close phase angle. We wait
another 55 minutes and do the CDH burn, the constant delta
height burn. That puts us right under the CM, behind them.
Then another 28 minutes and we do TPI, terminal phase initiation.
Another 36 minutes and we have intercept. We rendezvous and dock,
and haul all our stuff out of the lunar module. Stow the cases
on board the command module.

mitchell.JPG
Gone But Remembered
mitchell.JPG (28.19 KiB) Viewed 645 times


A couple hours after lift off we jettison the ascent stage.
Three hours after that, after a few system checks, we do a trans-
Earth burn on the lunar far side. As we come around the far side,
the Earth rises, and I’m at my sextant shooting stars as they rise
above the Earth and set behind the Moon. Centering the sextant on
the star and pressing a button when it passes below the horizon,
gives the computer everything it needs to know to figure out where
we are. That checks the inertial system, and the radar system.
The CM is in ‘barbecue mode’ rotating to even out the temperature
differences. From my vantage point at the sextant, I can see a 360
degree panorama, moon, sun, Earth, over and over again. I’m looking
back at Earth. I see its raining in South America. My mind flashes
to my survival training down in the Amazon. I get this image of
this tree I really admired, standing in a driving rain storm.

The sun is setting in Europe. I see the lights come on in Moscow.
I’m reminded of a State Department tour we took there a few years
back. I remember meeting the fellow who switched on the lights. I
wondered how he was. I wondered if he was thinking about me up here.

*
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Jim Mathias

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostTue May 23, 2017 3:31 am

Wade Hampton III wrote:Can you see city lights from the Moon?

Fred Bruan, Linux Software Developer (1996-present) posted...

People always ask me (Mitchell) what its like on the moon.
We’re too damned busy and scared to make a mistake to really
notice much. Our time is very scripted, that’s a good thing.
As lunar module pilot I had a helluva lot to do to get the
LEM ready for the descent to Fra Mauro and return. After
we left lunar orbit, I didn’t have anything to do but
look out the spacecraft window.

It was make work really, and a bad idea. So, we blast off the
Moon at the optimum phase angle, and boost for about 7 minutes.
We wait until the phase angle closes to our CSI, concentric
sequence initiation. That puts us into an elliptical orbit. We
are climbing toward the CM as we close phase angle. We wait
another 55 minutes and do the CDH burn, the constant delta
height burn. That puts us right under the CM, behind them.
Then another 28 minutes and we do TPI, terminal phase initiation.
Another 36 minutes and we have intercept. We rendezvous and dock,
and haul all our stuff out of the lunar module. Stow the cases
on board the command module.

mitchell.JPG


A couple hours after lift off we jettison the ascent stage.
Three hours after that, after a few system checks, we do a trans-
Earth burn on the lunar far side. As we come around the far side,
the Earth rises, and I’m at my sextant shooting stars as they rise
above the Earth and set behind the Moon. Centering the sextant on
the star and pressing a button when it passes below the horizon,
gives the computer everything it needs to know to figure out where
we are. That checks the inertial system, and the radar system.
The CM is in ‘barbecue mode’ rotating to even out the temperature
differences. From my vantage point at the sextant, I can see a 360
degree panorama, moon, sun, Earth, over and over again. *

Interesting experience related to us, thanks for sharing Wade.
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostTue May 23, 2017 3:40 pm

Jim Mathias wrote:Interesting experience related to us, thanks for sharing Wade.


No problem at all! Here is something new about the Eclipse from
Fraser Cain:

https://www.universetoday.com/135693/as ... g-eclipse/
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostSun May 28, 2017 9:06 pm

When, Where and How to See It!

On Aug. 21, 2017, people across the United States will see the Sun
disappear behind the Moon, turning daylight into twilight, causing
the temperature drop rapidly and revealing massive streamers of
light streaking through the sky around the silhouette of the Moon.
On that day, America will fall under the path of a total solar eclipse.

Get used to it! Before the end of the year, this is going to be old
news for the rest of our lives!

http://www.space.com/33797-total-solar- ... guide.html
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Wade Hampton III

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Re: Total solar eclipse to be seen across the U.S.

PostSun May 28, 2017 9:21 pm

Can Luna Be Colonized - aka A Red Moon?

Wayne Boyd, Philosopher, posted on May 2st:

Yes, and apparently China has plans to do it before the rest of
us. China is planning to build a colony of humans on the Moon
and use it for a launching pad to Mars. This is quite possible
to actually happen. I don’t favor manned missions to other planets
over unmanned probes, but I can’t help it if Communist China decides
they are going to do it. In the image below we see China’s spacecraft
recovery team working around the Shenzhou 11 landing capsule after
its landing in Inner Mongolia. Credit: Xinhua

China has been sending manned missions to space for sometime now.
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Red Moon
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