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Poetry of Rudyard Kipling

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White Man 1

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Poetry of Rudyard Kipling

PostSun Feb 12, 2017 10:46 am

The Stranger within my gate,
He may be true or kind,
But he does not talk my talk–
I cannot feel his mind.
I see the face and the eyes and the mouth,
But not the soul behind.
The men of my own stock,
They may do ill or well,
But they tell the lies I am wanted to,
They are used to the lies I tell;
And we do not need interpreters
When we go to buy or sell.
The Stranger within my gates,
He may be evil or good,
But I cannot tell what powers control–
What reasons sway his mood;
Nor when the Gods of his far-off land
Shall repossess his blood.
The men of my own stock,
Bitter bad they may be,
But, at least, they hear the things I hear,
And see the things I see;
And whatever I think of them and their likes
They think of the likes of me.
This was my father’s belief
And this is also mine:
Let the corn be all one sheaf–
And the grapes be all one vine,
Ere our children’s teeth are set on edge
By bitter bread and wine.
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Will Williams

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Re: Rudyard Kipling "The Stranger"

PostSun Feb 12, 2017 8:40 pm

That's a great one, White Man 1! Rudyard was N-S before it was cool.

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White Man 1

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Re: Rudyard Kipling "The Stranger"

PostMon Feb 13, 2017 8:05 pm

Kipling understood race in a way that few do anymore. Any upstanding White person should have at least a few of his works on their shelf.
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Volker Zorn

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Re: Rudyard Kipling "The Stranger"

PostSat Feb 18, 2017 10:15 pm

Here are the opening stanzas of another Kipling poem, sometimes referred to (incorrectly) as "The Law of the Jungle."

The Law for the Wolves

NOW this is the law of the jungle, as old and as true as the sky,
And the wolf that shall keep it may prosper, but the wolf that shall break it must die.

As the creeper that girdles the tree trunk, the law runneth over and back;
For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack.

Get it?
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Will Williams

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Re: Rudyard Kipling "The Stranger"

PostSun Feb 19, 2017 1:55 pm

Volker Zorn wrote:Here are the opening stanzas of another Kipling poem, sometimes referred to (incorrectly) as "The Law of the Jungle."

The Law for the Wolves

NOW this is the law of the jungle, as old and as true as the sky,
And the wolf that shall keep it may prosper, but the wolf that shall break it must die.

As the creeper that girdles the tree trunk, the law runneth over and back;
For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack.

Get it?


Why that's fascist! How absolutely awful of the wolf to see its strength in unity of the pack.
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Will Williams

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Poetry of Rudyard Kipling

PostTue Jul 11, 2017 11:50 am

A recent National Alliance supporter told me he had never heard this great poem about our slow-to-boil Saxon blood. Every White Racial Loyalist (WRL) should be aware of this poet and inspired by his words here:
---

THE WRATH OF THE
AWAKENED SAXON

by Rudyard Kipling

It was not part of their blood,
It came to them very late,
With long arrears to make good,
When the Saxon began to hate.

They were not easily moved,
They were icy -- willing to wait
Till every count should be proved,
Ere the Saxon began to hate.

Their voices were even and low.
Their eyes were level and straight.
There was neither sign nor show
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not preached to the crowd.
It was not taught by the state.
No man spoke it aloud
When the Saxon began to hate.

It was not suddenly bred.
It will not swiftly abate.
Through the chilled years ahead,
When Time shall count from the date
That the Saxon began to hate.


It is getting to be that time again, when collectively the Saxon begins to hate that which would destroy him and his.

Kipling biography - https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/rudyard-kipling Excerpt:
Rudyard Kipling is one of the best-known of the late Victorian poets and story-tellers. Although he was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1907, his unpopular political views caused his work to be neglected shortly after his death.

Critics, however, recognize the power of his work. "His unrelenting craftsmanship, his determination to be 'master of the bricks and mortar of his trade,' compels respect, and his genius as a storyteller, and especially as a teller of stories for children," writes William Blackburn in Writers for Children, "will surely prove stronger than the murky and sordid vicissitudes of politics." "Although Kipling's overall career still awaits judicious critical re-evaluation," Blackburn concludes, "the general public—and especially the young public—has long since rendered its own verdict. His status as a writer for children is rightfully secure, and none of his major works has yet gone out of print."

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